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I'm unclear on a basic principle of how Git branches work.

Say I have a repo on master branch (which is the trunk of my project) and it's at v 1.0. Then I decide I want to create an experimental branch to do some funky new stuff, so I do git branch experimental from the master branch and add some new functionality, and commit my changes to experimental.

My partner goes and updates the master branch to v 1.1, and I pull his changes into my master branch.

Will all the v 1.0 files in the experimental branch that were not modified by my edits to experimental stay current with the latest master files (eg. become v 1.1)?

Or do I need to merge the master branch into experimental to prevent all non-modified files in the experimental branch from staying at v 1.0 ?

If so, what's the process for merging these 1.1 changes into experimental without also contaminating the master branch with my funky new stuff?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Will all the v 1.0 files in the experimental branch that were not modified by my edits to experimental stay current with the latest master files (eg. become v 1.1)?

No Git will not modify any files behind your back. Maybe you want it to stay at 1.0 ;)

Or do I need to merge the master branch into experimental to prevent all non-modified files in the experimental branch from staying at v 1.0 ?

Correct.

If so, what's the process for merging these 1.1 changes into experimental without also contaminating the master branch with my funky new stuff?

$ git checkout experimental
$ git merge master
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On your experimental branch, run

git merge master
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so git merge master will pull all the new stuff in the master branch into the experimental branch, without putting any of the experimental branch changes back into master? Thanks! –  julio Dec 21 '11 at 20:14
    
Yes that's correct. –  Eben Geer Dec 21 '11 at 20:16

Branches in Git are very light weight. This means that they are simply pointers to particular commits. Commits are linked to one another via a parent pointer. This means you don't know the children (the subsequent commits) if you have a reference to a particular one. Merges are commits with multiple parents. Branches are commits that happen to be pointed at by more than one commits' parents. Each commit also points to a snapshot of all the files in the repository.

This web of commits is referred to as the DAG (directed acyclic graph).

You can read more about it here:

http://progit.org/book/ch9-2.html

and here:

http://eagain.net/articles/git-for-computer-scientists/

Once you understand this, branching becomes clear as day! :)

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