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What is the proper way to dispose of SWT Shells? I have created some Dialogs with success following the template given in the Dialog API docs. The SWT API for Dialog says:

The basic template for a user-defined dialog typically looks something like this:

 public class MyDialog extends Dialog {
        Object result;

        public MyDialog (Shell parent, int style) {
                super (parent, style);
        }
        public MyDialog (Shell parent) {
                this (parent, 0); // your default style bits go here (not the Shell's style bits)
        }
        public Object open () {
                Shell parent = getParent();
                Shell shell = new Shell(parent, SWT.DIALOG_TRIM | SWT.APPLICATION_MODAL);
                shell.setText(getText());
                // Your code goes here (widget creation, set result, etc).
                shell.open();
                Display display = parent.getDisplay();
                while (!shell.isDisposed()) {
                        if (!display.readAndDispatch()) display.sleep();
                }
                return result;
        }
 }

The Dialogs I have created do not have their own taskbar icon on Windows, as I would expect for a Dialog. I now want to create some Shells, which if I understand correctly will receive their own taskbar entry on Windows?

In contrast to the directions given in the above API docs, I have also seen an article which seems to suggest that having a while loop as shown in the API docs is the wrong way to do it. The article instead suggests disposing the Shell by using the close event listener.

What is the correct way to dispose of SWT Shells (and while were on the topic, Dialogs as well)?

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Hopefully I can help explain what's going on here.

Dialog is basically just a convenient class to subclass, because Shell itself is not supposed to be subclassed. You can create shells without using Dialog at all, if you want to. In this case, your MyDialog class is a class that others can use to open the same kind of dialog repeatedly.

This piece of code drives the SWT event loop as long as the shell is open (clicking the close button on the shell disposes the shell by default):

            while (!shell.isDisposed()) {
                    if (!display.readAndDispatch()) display.sleep();
            }

You have to call Display.readAndDispatch periodically to keep your SWT application from "locking up". Basically it causes all of the incoming events from the operating system (keyboard and mouse events, repaint events, etc.) to be correctly processed by your application. readAndDispatch basically takes an event from the application's event queue and invokes the correct listeners. In an Eclipse RCP application, the workbench is normally responsible for "pumping" the event loop and you don't have to mess with it. Here's a little more info about the event loop.

The purpose of "manually" pumping the event loop in this context is to prevent MyDialog.open from returning while the shell is not disposed, but still keep the application from "hanging". If your MyDialog.open method tried to wait for the shell to be disposed, but it didn't pump the event loop, your application would "lock up" because without the event loop running, there's no way for the shell to ever be notified that it should be disposed!

You can create shells without using this pattern. Here's an example of a very simple SWT application that opens a ton of shells all at once and keeps running as long as at least one of them is still open (I've omitted the package declaration and imports):

public class Shells {
    private static int numDisposals = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Display d = Display.getDefault();

        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            Shell s = new Shell(d);
            s.open();
            s.addDisposeListener(new DisposeListener() {
                @Override
                public void widgetDisposed(DisposeEvent arg0) {
                    numDisposals++;
                }
            });
        }

        while (numDisposals < 5) {
            while (!d.readAndDispatch()) {
                d.sleep();
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that I add a DisposeListener to each shell so I can take some action when the shell is closed. You can also use IShellListener to listen more directly for the close event and even actually prevent it (which you might want to do if the shell contains unsaved work, for example). Here's an annoying modification to the first program that starts 5 shells and randomly prevents you from closing them:

public class Shells {
    private static Random r = new Random();
    private static int numDisposals = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Display d = Display.getDefault();

        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            Shell s = new Shell(d);
            s.open();
            s.addShellListener(new ShellAdapter() {
                @Override
                public void shellClosed(ShellEvent e) {
                    boolean close = r.nextBoolean();
                    if (close) {
                        System.out.println("Alright, shell closing.");
                    } else {
                        System.out.println("Try again.");
                    }
                    e.doit = close;
                }
            });
            s.addDisposeListener(new DisposeListener() {
                @Override
                public void widgetDisposed(DisposeEvent arg0) {
                    numDisposals++;
                }
            });
        }

        while (numDisposals < 5) {
            while (!d.readAndDispatch()) {
                d.sleep();
            }
        }
    }
}

Hopefully this has helped make things more clear!


Edited to add: I'm not totally sure why you aren't getting a windows taskbar item for your shell, but I suspect it has something to do with the style flags you're passing into the shell's constructor. The shells in my example have no style flags and they all get a taskbar icon.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this very informative answer. About the taskbar icon: I have set the "main window" as the parent of my dialog shell. When you pass another shell as a parent to the new shell's constructor, then the new shell will not receive a taskbar icon, and the new shell will always be on top of it's parent (so as not to be ignored). Only shells which have the display as their parent are shown on the taskbar (Windows 7). At least, this is what my testing has suggested. – Buttons840 Dec 22 '11 at 18:04

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