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I am working on a small java bytecode instrumentation tool.

The general idea is to have all of a class methods renamed with a _CONGU suffix, creating then proxy methods with the original method names that will call their _CONGU counterparts.

For instance, if a class C contains a int m() { return 1; } method, the instrumented C class will have a int m_CONGU() { return 1; } method and a int m() { return m_CONGU(); } method.

Later on I'll add some extra logic on int m() that will do some checks before calling m_CONGU().

At the moment, I am in the process of instrumenting all constructor invocation calls to a method of mine with the _CONGU suffix.

Bellow you can see both the instrumented and non-instrumented versions of the inverse() method of a Fraction class. enter image description here

When trying to run this code

Fraction fraction = new Fraction(4, 1);

I get the following exception which is puzzling me for the last couple of hours:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError: (class: jorgeTestes/system/fraction/Fraction, method: inverse_CONGU signature: ()LjorgeTestes/system/fraction/Fraction;) Expecting to find object/array on stack at jorgeTestes.system.fraction.XyzTest.main(XyzTest.java:9)

I guess this must be a dead obvious mistake, but I can't get what the problem might be. It looks to be in some way related to having the wrong number of data in the stack, but it looks to me that the number of elements in the stack is the same both on the original and instrumented code (at least that's what should be happening). Any ideas?

Some more info:

1) here are the descriptors of both <init> and Fraction_CONGU(which are the same, as one would expect!): enter image description here

2) I'm wondering if the color of [0] Code being different in Bytecode Viewer could mean there's some other problem with my instrumented code? Maybe there is some metadata that's being broken in the process, so that could be the reason the code looks alright and there's still a problem when trying to run the code?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like the code on the first screenshot is fundamentally broken. Object construction in JVM bytecode can be split into two phass: allocating memory on the heap and calling a constructor (with optional parameters) against that allocated memory:

new #1 <Fraction>  //allocate memory
dup                //duplicate to not loose the object after calling constructor
                   //push c-tor args onto the stack here
invokespecial <Fraction.<init>>  //constructor, second `this` is lost
areturn            //returns first `this`

What you are basically doing is: allocate some raw (probably zeroed) memory on the heap and invoke virtual method Fraction_congu against that memory block. You haven't yet called the constructor!

Also there should be invokevirtual, I guess this generated methods are private.

UPDATE: I assume you want to transform the following class:

class Fraction {

    public Fraction(float den, float num) {
        //original constructor code here
    }

    public int m() {
        return 1;
    }
}

Into:

class Fraction {

    public Fraction(float den, float num) {
        //proxy method
        //place for extra logic 
        Fraction_CONGU(den, num);
    }

    private Fraction_CONGU(float den, float num) {
        //original constructor code here
    }

    public int m() {
        //proxy method
        //place for extra logic 
        return m_CONGU
    }

    private int m_CONGU() {
        return 1;
    }
}

As you can see it is perfectly possible (if I get your idea correctly). Just compile this Java code and see how compiler implemented this.

Which begs a question: can't you just use AspectJ with compile time-weaving?

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Argh, you are right. Which now begs the question of whether what I'm trying to do can really be done this way. (btw, at the moment the generated _CONGU methods are public) –  devoured elysium Dec 21 '11 at 21:28
    
@devouredelysium: see my update, I think it is perfectly possible. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Dec 21 '11 at 21:34
    
just a small thing, need c-tor args before invoke special. –  bestsss Dec 21 '11 at 21:34
    
@TomaszNurkiewicz: "Which begs a question: can't you just use AspectJ with compile time-weaving?" Unfortunately, that's out of my hands to decide and we are already far advanced in the project :( –  devoured elysium Dec 21 '11 at 21:36
    
@bestsss - you're right, I added a comment in the correct place, thanks! –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Dec 21 '11 at 21:40

You need to special case constructors and calls to constructors when you are instrumenting.

Notice how the instrumented is calling invokevirtual, and the non-instrumented is calling invokespecial.

The object on the stack returned by the new opcode can't be handled by any opcode other than invokespecial.

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The instrumented version is calling invokevirtual because Fraction_CONGU() is a method, indeed. But maybe having Fraction_CONGU() being a a constructor would solve my issue.. –  devoured elysium Dec 21 '11 at 21:32
    
Having the constructor call a _CONGU() constructor raises the problem of how to make another constructor with the same parameters! As all constructors have the same name, I can't make that distinction.. –  devoured elysium Dec 21 '11 at 21:58
    
You have the option of not instrumenting constructors or constructor calls at all; other option would be to have a single no-arg constructor and replace all constructors with a member function that calls this. –  antlersoft Dec 21 '11 at 22:15
    
I really need instrumented constructors :-(. I can't have a default non-arg constructor as that would forbid the client class to have a no-arg constructor itself! –  devoured elysium Dec 22 '11 at 3:01

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