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$("input[type=radio]").change(function(){
    alert(this.val());
}); 

Why this won't work? What I want is that every time a radio button is selected, the page alerts its value.

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Do you have any errors? Is the DOM ready when this is executed? We need to see the whole page with the HTML. –  Alex Turpin Dec 21 '11 at 21:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I believe you need to do this:

$("input[type=radio]").change(function(){
    alert($(this).val());
}); 
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As @Eonasdan already said, you need to use $(this).val().

The reason for this is that this points to the plain DOM element and .val() needs a jQuery object.

By the way, you must quote the attribute value in an attribute selector: $("input[type='radio']")

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+1 for 'must quote the attribute='value' selector' –  Andrew Whitaker Dec 21 '11 at 21:40
    
Although their documentation calls them "mandatory", the requirement for quotes is secretly true only for attribute values with spaces in them, and for jQuery 1.4.4+; versions before that work fine (most of the time). With that said, I do recommend always including quotes anyway. –  Cory Dec 21 '11 at 21:41
    
I guess the quotes are only optional for space-less cases to avoid breaking legacy code and tons of older plugins. So just like you can write alphanumerical strings in PHP without quotes (yes, really! will throw a "treating constant as string" notice though) it's nothing you should do. –  ThiefMaster Dec 22 '11 at 2:32

You need to 'jQuerify' the this object:

Rather than this.val() it should be $(this).val()

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Try this, instead:

$("input[type=radio]").change(function(){
    alert($(this).val());
});

You must wrap this in a jQuery object to use the .val() method.

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in jQuery, functions you pass to it's API provide this as the DOM elements that matched your selector. However, this is not a jQuery object, it is actually a plain of DOM element. If you want to call jQuery methods on this, you need to wrap this in jQuery: $(this).

$("input[type=radio]").change(function(){
    alert($(this).val());
});

And don't forget to cache it if you use it multiple times to avoid recreating the wrapper over and over.

$("input[type=radio]").change(function(){
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.addClass('omgitchanged');
    alert($this.val());
});
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