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I am to create a clock displaying Military and Normal time in two different classes and time declared as objects.That is done but now i need to extend the clock class into a AMPMclock that has the setAMPM(boolean yes) method in it. If the setAMPM(true) it will display the military time and if it is false it will display the Normal time. I create the setAMPM method

class AMPMclock extends clock
{
    boolean setAMPM(boolean yes)
    { 
        return yes;
    }  
}

class clock
{
    private int hours;
    private int minutes;
    private int seconds;
private boolean yes;

    setMin....

    setHour...

    setSec....

    tick() ///moves the clock 1sec


    public String toString()
    {

        if(yes) return String.format("%d:%02d:%02d %s", (hours == 12 || hours == 0)?12 : hours%12, minutes, seconds, (hours < 12)? "AM" : "PM");
        else return String.format("%02d:%02d:%02d",hours,minutes,seconds);
    //else 
    }

}


MAIN

AMPMclock clockObject = new AMPMclock();

clockObject.setHour(16);
clockObject.setMin(28);
clockObject.setSec(58);



    System.out.println(clockObject.toString());
    clockObject.tick();
    clockObject.setAMPM(false);
    System.out.println(clockObject.toString());

    clockObject.tick();
    clockObject.setAMPM(true);
    System.out.println(clockObject.toString());
    clockObject.tick();
    System.out.println(clockObject.toString());

However whet i use clockObject.setAMPM(true) or clockObject.setAMPM(false) the yes boolean will not change so i can use it in another method. It always stay the same...Any help? Tnx

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1  
Your question is totally unclear. Please add some code that illustrates the problem you're having. –  Oliver Charlesworth Dec 21 '11 at 21:37
    
This code hurts my eyes. –  Martijn Courteaux Dec 21 '11 at 22:45

4 Answers 4

The idea of a setter is to encapsulate a private instance variable. You are simply returning the parameter back without modifying the internal state of the class, which is why nothing "sticks" in your code.

class Clock {

     private boolean useAMPM;

     public void setAMPM(boolean useAMPM) {
         this.useAMPM = useAMPM;
     }

     public boolean isAMPM() {
         return this.useAMPM;
     }
}
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1  
Just to adjust to the Java Bean standards, the getter should be isAMPM(). –  Marcelo Dec 21 '11 at 21:42
    
ok but i need to use the useAMPM as well inside the "clock" class. i declare the "private boolean useAMPM;" but it is not recognized even though the clock is extended. –  Stefanos Varsanis Dec 21 '11 at 22:31
    
@StefanosVarsanis, if AMPM is only relevant to the subclass, I would be tempted to let it simply be an implementation detail of the subclass and possibly override ToString if need be. Otherwise, you will need to put the variable in the super class and open it up, possibly using the protected keyword instead of private so that subclasses can see it. The downside is that any class in the same package would also be able to see it. You'll have to evaluate each approach to see what best fits your need. –  Anthony Pegram Dec 22 '11 at 0:13
    
Thanks a lot Antony.I changed the variables into protected and overrode the toString method.Will try to see a different solution as well. –  Stefanos Varsanis Dec 22 '11 at 14:26

If you save a setting for example in an ampm instance variable, then you need something like:

boolean ampm = true;

boolean setAMPM(boolean yes)
{
    ampm = yes;
    return yes;
}  
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May be you need to follow java bean conventions ?

Is this what you are aiming to achieve ?

public class AMPMClock {

  private boolean isAMPM;

  public void setAMPM(boolean ampmFlag){
    this.isAMPM = ampmFlag;
  }
  public boolean isAMPM(){
   return this.isAMPM;
  }

}
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you probably need to store that in a member variable…

    private boolean useAMPM = false;
    public boolean setAMPM (final boolean wantAMPM) {
          useAMPM = wantAMPM;
          return useAMPM;
    }
    public void draw () {
            … 
          if (useAMPM) { /* … */ } else { /* … */ }
    }

The variables in a method's lambda list (the ones you specify when you define a method, like wantAMPM/yes) are assigned when the function is called, and destroyed when the function returns. (It's a good habit to declare them all final, for various reasons, as well.) In fact, you can also create automatic variables within (almost) any pair of { braces } in a Java program, which will likewise be destroyed when you reach the end of the } block.

Member variables (properties) are kept around for the lifetime of the object instance in which they're found. So when, e.g. you say Clock clockInstance = new Clock ();, then clock.useAMPM will be created, and continue to exist until clockInstance is destroyed.

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