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When I override the clone() method of a Backbone.Model, is there a way to call this overriden method from my implantation? Something like this:

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    clone: function(){
        super.clone();//calling the original clone method
    }
})
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9 Answers 9

up vote 64 down vote accepted

You'll want to use:

Backbone.Model.prototype.clone.call(this);

This will call the original clone() method from Backbone.Model with the context of this(The current model).

From Backbone docs:

Brief aside on super: JavaScript does not provide a simple way to call super — the function of the same name defined higher on the prototype chain. If you override a core function like set, or save, and you want to invoke the parent object's implementation, you'll have to explicitly call it [demonstrated above]

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Backbone docs seems to suggest e.g. Backbone.Model.prototype.set.apply(this, arguments); what is the difference between using prototype.func_name.apply(...) and prototype.func_name.call(...) ? –  Mikael Lepistö May 13 '13 at 10:06
4  
@MikaelLepistö see the question stackoverflow.com/questions/1986896/… –  soldier.moth May 13 '13 at 18:22

You can also use the __super__ property which is a reference to the parent class prototype:

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
  clone: function(){
    MyModel.__super__.clone.call(this);
  }
});
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12  
Just a little background on this answer: __super__ is a reference to the parent's prototype that Backbone framework makes every time a Backbone model, collection, router, or view is extended. While it's not a standard property it does work cross-browser since its framework generated. However, even the Backbone official docs don't mention this and say to use Backbone.Model.prototype.set.call(this, attributes, options); method. Both seem to work fine, though. –  Mauvis Ledford Oct 29 '12 at 22:27
    
@MauvisLedford Is your example code correct or should the .set. be .clone. for the OP's use case? –  MikeSchinkel Jul 26 '13 at 17:49
    
Mine was just a non-related example. It would be Backbone.Model.prototype.clone.call(this, attributes, options); in his case. –  Mauvis Ledford Jul 26 '13 at 21:27
    
You could also use: this.constructor.__super__ –  Jason M Jul 31 at 19:09

Josh Nielsen found an elegant solution for this, which hides a lot of the ugliness.

Just add this snippet to your app to extend Backbone's model:

Backbone.Model.prototype._super = function(funcName){
    return this.constructor.prototype[funcName].apply(this, _.rest(arguments));
}

Then use it like this:

Model = Backbone.model.extend({
    set: function(arg){
        // your code here

        // call the super class function
        this._super('set', arg);
    }
});
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this only works when there is only one level of implementation A.foo -> B.foo, in the case of A.foo -> B.foo -> C.foo you will get a stack overflow due to B's this refering to itself –  theporchrat Sep 5 at 16:41

Have a look at this: https://github.com/lukasolson/Backbone-Super

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This looks great. –  Mauvis Ledford Oct 29 '12 at 22:34

I believe you can cache the original method (although not tested):

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
  origclone: Backbone.Model.clone,
  clone: function(){
    origclone();//calling the original clone method
  }
});
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If you want just to call this._super(); without passing the function name as an argument

Backbone.Controller.prototype._super = function(){
    var fn = Backbone.Controller.prototype._super.caller, funcName;

    $.each(this, function (propName, prop) {
        if (prop == fn) {
            funcName = propName;
        }
    });

    return this.constructor.__super__[funcName].apply(this, _.rest(arguments));
}

Better use this plugin: https://github.com/lukasolson/Backbone-Super

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backbone._super.js, from my gists: https://gist.github.com/sarink/a3cf3f08c17691395edf

// Forked/modified from: https://gist.github.com/maxbrunsfeld/1542120
// This method gives you an easier way of calling super when you're using Backbone in plain javascript.
// It lets you avoid writing the constructor's name multiple times.
// You still have to specify the name of the method.
//
// So, instead of having to write:
//
//    var Animal = Backbone.Model.extend({
//        word: "",
//        say: function() {
//            return "I say " + this.word;
//        }
//    });
//    var Cow = Animal.extend({
//        word: "moo",
//        say: function() {
//            return Animal.prototype.say.apply(this, arguments) + "!!!"
//        }
//    });
//
//
// You get to write:
//
//    var Animal = Backbone.Model.extend({
//        word: "",
//        say: function() {
//            return "I say " + this.word;
//        }
//    });
//    var Cow = Animal.extend({
//        word: "moo",
//        say: function() {
//            return this._super("say", arguments) + "!!!"
//        }
//    });

(function(root, factory) {
    if (typeof define === "function" && define.amd) {
        define(["underscore", "backbone"], function(_, Backbone) {
            return factory(_, Backbone);
        });
    }
    else if (typeof exports !== "undefined") {
        var _ = require("underscore");
        var Backbone = require("backbone");
        module.exports = factory(_, Backbone);
    }
    else {
        factory(root._, root.Backbone);
    }
}(this, function(_, Backbone) {
    "use strict";

    // Finds the next object up the prototype chain that has a different implementation of the method.
    var findSuper = function(methodName, childObject) {
        var object = childObject;
        while (object[methodName] === childObject[methodName]) {
            object = object.constructor.__super__;
        }
        return object;
    };

    var _super = function(methodName) {
        // Keep track of how far up the prototype chain we have traversed, in order to handle nested calls to `_super`.
        this.__superCallObjects__ || (this.__superCallObjects__ = {});
        var currentObject = this.__superCallObjects__[methodName] || this;
        var parentObject  = findSuper(methodName, currentObject);
        this.__superCallObjects__[methodName] = parentObject;

        // If `methodName` is a function, call it with `this` as the context and `args` as the arguments, if it's an object, simply return it.
        var args = _.tail(arguments);
        var result = (_.isFunction(parentObject[methodName])) ? parentObject[methodName].apply(this, args) : parentObject[methodName];
        delete this.__superCallObjects__[methodName];
        return result;
    };

    // Mix in to Backbone classes
    _.each(["Model", "Collection", "View", "Router"], function(klass) {
        Backbone[klass].prototype._super = _super;
    });

    return Backbone;
}));
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Pass the parent class as an option during instantiation:

BaseModel = Backbone.Model.extend({
    initialize: function(attributes, options) {
        var self = this;
        this.myModel = new MyModel({parent: self});
    } 
});

Then in your MyModel you can call parent methods like this

this.options.parent.method(); Keep in mind this creates a retain cycle on the two objects. So to let the garbage collector do it's job you would need to manually destroy the retain on one of the objects when finished with it. If you're application is pretty large. I would encourage you to look more into hierarchal setups so events can travel up to the correct object.

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In the case that you don't know what the parent class is exactly (multiple inheritance or you want a helper function) then you can use the following:

var ChildModel = ParentModel.extend({

  initialize: function() {
    this.__proto__.constructor.__super__.initialize.apply(this, arguments);
    // Do child model initialization.
  }

});

With helper function:

function parent(instance) {
  return instance.__proto__.constructor.__super__;
};

var ChildModel = ParentModel.extend({

  initialize: function() {
    parent(this).initialize.apply(this, arguments);
    // Do child model initialization.
  }

});
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