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I have a PURCHASES table that has a unique ID of PURCHASE_ID. I want to break down how many distinct customers purchases they had per year that had at least 2 unique purchases. This is the query that I wrote:

SELECT 
  YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME) PURCHASE_YEAR,
  COUNT(DISTINCT CUSTOMER_ID) TOTAL_CUSTOMERS
FROM PURCHASES
GROUP BY YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME)
HAVING COUNT(PURCHASE_ID) > 1

However, this query is giving me the total distinct patients per year of purchase no matter how many purchases they had. Meaning, that I am getting customers that had only 1 purchase for the year AND those that had more than one. It is as if the HAVING clause is being ignored.
It doesn’t change anything if I use a HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT PURCHASE_ID) > 1 either. Even though I shouldn’t technically need that since the PURCHASE_ID is already unique and is a primary key.

This works though.

SELECT 
  PURCHASE_YEAR,
  COUNT(DISTINCT CUSTOMER_ID) TOTAL_CUSTOMERS
FROM
(
  SELECT 
    YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME) PURCHASE_YEAR, 
    CUSTOMER_ID
  FROM PURCHASES
  GROUP BY YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME),CUSTOMER_ID
  HAVING COUNT(PURCHASE_ID) > 1
) VW
GROUP BY PURCHASE_YEAR
share|improve this question
1  
You aren't grouping by CUSTOMER_ID in your first query so how do you expect it to know that's what you want? –  Martin Smith Dec 21 '11 at 22:03
    
The way I see it is that the HAVING clause should only be giving me records though for those having more than one purchase. Then I am doing a distinct count of those customers by year. –  bjsql Dec 21 '11 at 22:05
1  
That may be the way you see it but it ain't what you have coded! You are grouping by year so it will return those years with at least one purchase. –  Martin Smith Dec 21 '11 at 22:07
    
Ok. So what effect is the HAVING COUNT(PURCHASE_ID) > 1 having on that query? I see the first query giving me a distinct count of customers per calendar year since that is the only grouping. The HAVING clause then is evaluated second right? So this is then saying out of those, only give those records from that grouping by year with a count of PURCHASE_ID > 1. –  bjsql Dec 21 '11 at 22:14
    
Your first query divides the data up into one group for each year then for each group (i.e. year) counts the number of purchase_Ids in that year. If any of the years has <=1 then it will be excluded. –  Martin Smith Dec 21 '11 at 22:17

3 Answers 3

try this:

    SELECT PURCHASE_YEAR,
    COUNT(1) AS CNT
    FROM 
        (SELECT YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME) PURCHASE_YEAR,
        CUSTOMER_ID
        FROM PURCHASES 
        GROUP BY YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME), 
                 CUSTOMER_ID
        HAVING COUNT(1) > 1) AS CNT
    GROUP BY PURCHASE_YEAR
    ORDER BY PURCHASE_YEAR
share|improve this answer
    
Placing your having clause in a subquery like this will ensure that out query only sees the records that meet the requirements. If this is 2005 or later I think a CTE would be more readable, but this tecnique should work quote well. –  TimothyAWiseman Dec 21 '11 at 22:29

Try the following:

SELECT 
  YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME) PURCHASE_YEAR,
  COUNT(CUSTOMER_ID) TOTAL_CUSTOMERS
FROM PURCHASES
GROUP BY YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME), CUSTOMER_ID
HAVING COUNT(PURCHASE_ID) > 1
share|improve this answer
    
That will bring back 1 row per customer b/c of the GROUP BY –  JBrooks Dec 21 '11 at 22:09

Try adding DISTINCT to your filter:

SELECT 
  YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME) PURCHASE_YEAR,
  COUNT(DISTINCT CUSTOMER_ID) TOTAL_CUSTOMERS
FROM PURCHASES
GROUP BY YEAR(PURCHASE_TIME)
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT PURCHASE_ID) > 1
share|improve this answer
    
This is one that I tried as well, but I still get those customers that have only one purchase. –  bjsql Dec 21 '11 at 22:17
    
@bjsql are you sure you added the DISTINCT to the HAVING clause? HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT PURCHASE_ID) > 1 I worked fine for me. –  norlando Dec 22 '11 at 13:30

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