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So I have a text file like this:

Item a: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 20 min

I'd like to replace <total> with the total of 10 and 20. Right now I'm doing it with the following functions:

let g:S = 0  "result in global variable S
function! Sum(number)
  let g:S = g:S + a:number
  return a:number
endfunction

function! SumSelection()
  let g:S=0
  '<,'>s/\d\+/\=Sum(submatch(0))/g
  echo g:S
endfunction

vnoremap <s-e> call SumSelection()<cr>

Sum gets the sum of numbers passed in, SumSelection calls sum over all the numbers in selected lines, and (supposedly) Shift+e calls SumSelection in visual mode (or whatever you choose to call it.)

Problem is, when I hit Shift+e when I have some lines selected, instead of :call SumSelection() I really get :'<,'>call SumSelection() which means the function gets called once per selected line. No good, right? So as far as I can tell there's no way around this. What can I do to get the function to:

  1. be only called once
  2. maybe total these in a more efficient way
share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Well, to have a function execute just once over a range, append the range keyword. E.g.

fun Foo() range
    ...
endfun

Then your function can take care of the range itself with the special parameters a:firstline and a:lastline. (See :help a:firstline for details.)

However I think that in this case your requirements are just about simple enough to be accomplished with a one-liner using :global.

We could do with better specified inputs and outputs really. But assuming a file containing

Item a: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 20 min
Item b: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
Item c: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
  Subitem 3: 43 min

and a function defined as

fun! Sum(n)
    let g:s += a:n
    return a:n
endfun

then this will sum the subitems (all one line)

:g/^Item/ let g:s = 0 | mark a | +,-/\nItem\|\%$/ s/\v(\d+)\ze\s+min$/\=Sum(submatch(0))/g | 'a s/<total>/\=(g:s . ' min')/

and produce this output

Item a: 30 min
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 20 min
Item b: 33 min
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
Item c: 76 min
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
  Subitem 3: 43 min

By the way, the above command acts on the whole buffer. If you highlight a range first and then hit the : key, vim will automatically prepend your command with '<,'> meaning that the following command will operate from the start to the end of the highlighted range.

E.g. highlighting lines 1 to 5 and then running the command (:'<,'> g/...) produces this output

Item a: 30 min
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 20 min
Item b: 33 min
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
Item c: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
  Subitem 3: 43 min

One final note. If one of the groups has no subitems, e.g.

Item a: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 20 min
Item b: <total>
Item c: <total>
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
  Subitem 3: 43 min

then the command will abort with an 'Invalid range' error when it reaches the second item. You can get Vim to ignore this and carry on regardless by prefixing the whole command with :silent!.

share|improve this answer
2  
it's... beautiful... Seriously, thanks for the best SO answer I've probably ever received. – Brian Hicks Dec 22 '11 at 2:47
2  
Btw, for anyone who thinks that the :g command above looks complex, it isn't really. The syntax is very terse which might give it that appearance, but the operations are really quite straightforward; there aren't any clever tricks. Just look up the bits you don't get in the wonderful documentation, or ask on SO or the vim_use Google group. – King Mob Dec 22 '11 at 3:32
2  
It took me a long time to understand... so here is an explanation: :g starts a global command /^Item/ The command runs at each line that matches ^Item let g:s = 0 mark a Stores the position of cursor in a +,-/\nItem\|\%$/s/\v(\d+)\ze\s+min$/\=Sum(submatch(0))/g This is a massive beast of a substitute command. The part until the first 's' is the range, the part between the 's' and the '$' is the pattern and the function call is the replacement (nothing is actually replaced) 'a go back to the position marked a s/<total>/\=(g:s . ' min')/ finally replace the <total> – Mina Almasry Jul 31 '12 at 1:59
    
'nothing is actually replaced'. Yep, that's the key calling out to code from within regexps in Vim. – King Mob Aug 4 '12 at 5:27

I know my vim7.3-script is much longer than adscriven's.
But it can get the job done.

fun! SubTotal()
    fun! Collect()
        " define some global vars
        if line('.') == 1
            let g:dict = {}
            let g:key = ''
        endif

        " set current key && add key to dict
        fun! AddKey(k)
            let g:key = a:k
            let g:dict[a:k]= []
        endfun

        " add value to dict[key]
        fun! AddValue(v)
            if g:key != ''
                call add(g:dict[g:key], a:v)
            endif
        endfun

        " scan every line
        let line = getline('.')
        if line =~ '^Item'
            call AddKey(matchstr(line, '^Item\s\+\zs\w\+\ze\s*:'))
        elseif line =~ '^\s*Subitem'
            call AddValue(str2nr(matchstr(line, '\d\+\ze\s*min$')))
        endif
        return line
    endfun

    " collect data line by line
    silent %s/.*/\=Collect()/
    " replace <total> with sum
    silent g/^Item/s/^Item\s\+\(\w\+\)\s*:\s*\zs.*/\=eval(join(g:dict[submatch(1)], '+'))/
endfun

Item a: 30
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 20 min
Item b: 33
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
Item c: 76
  Subitem: 10 min
  Subitem 2: 23 min
  Subitem 3: 43 min

:echo dict
{'a': [10, 20], 'b': [10, 23], 'c': [10, 23, 43]}
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