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For a given table 'foo', I need a query to generate a set of tables that have foreign keys that point to foo. I'm using Oracle 10G.

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This article may help: http://www.databasejournal.com/features/oracle/article.php/3665591 –  Sean Sep 17 '08 at 18:22
    
If you just need this info in order to drop the table, you can also use DROP TABLE xx CASCADE CONSTRAINTS –  Sten Vesterli Sep 17 '08 at 19:16
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4 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

This should work (or something close):

select table_name
from all_constraints
where constraint_type='R'
and r_constraint_name in 
  (select constraint_name
  from all_constraints
  where constraint_type in ('P','U')
  and table_name='<your table here>');
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link to Oracle Database Online Documentation

You may want to explore the Data Dictionary views. They have the prefixes:

  • User
  • All
  • DBA

sample:

select * from dictionary where table_name like 'ALL%'


Continuing Mike's example, you may want to generate scripts to enable/disable the constraints. I only modified the 'select' in the first row.

select  'alter table ' || TABLE_NAME || ' disable constraint ' || CONSTRAINT_NAME || ';'
from all_constraints
where constraint_type='R'
and r_constraint_name in 
  (select constraint_name
  from all_constraints
  where constraint_type in ('P','U')
  and table_name='<your table here>');
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The following statement should give the children and all of their descendents. I have tested it on an Oracle 10 database.

SELECT  level, main.table_name  parent,
    link.table_name child
FROM    user_constraints main, user_constraints link    
WHERE   main.constraint_type    IN ('P', 'U')
AND link.r_constraint_name  = main.constraint_name
START WITH main.table_name  LIKE UPPER('&&table_name')
CONNECT BY main.table_name = PRIOR link.table_name
ORDER BY level, main.table_name, link.table_name
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nice use of hierarchical retrieval. However when you have tables with self referencing foreign keys, it will generate error. –  focusHard Aug 8 '13 at 18:22
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Download the Oracle Reference Guide for 10G which explains the data dictionary tables.

The answers above are good but check out the other tables which may relate to constraints.

select * from dict where table_name like '%CONS%';

Finally, get a tool like Toad or SQL Developer which allows you to browse this stuff in a UI, you need to learn to use the tables but you should use a UI also.

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