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I have a small snippet of code from my config script, the idea is the configuration is loaded then each key is checked for the hostname that has been entered. But if a configuration is found to contain the same hostname then it is rejected and displays a warning message that a configruation with that hostname already exists.

The problem is I need the foreach loop that checks for the existance of the hash key to restart the do-while loop so another hostname can be tried or the user can ^C out of the script.

Here is the snippet;

my $host;
do {
    print "Enter the hostname or IP of the ESXi server: ";
    chomp($host = <STDIN>);

    if ($host eq '') {
        print "You must enter a hostname or IP address!\n";
    } elsif ($host ne '') {

        # We need to catch duplicate configurations for we don't do the same work twice
        foreach (keys %config) {
            if ($config{$_}{host} ne $host) {
                last;
            } elsif ($config{$_}{host} eq $host) {
                warn "Configuration for $host already exists!\n";
            }
        }

        if ($ping_obj->ping($host)) {
            $config{$config_tag}{host} = $host;
        } elsif (! $ping_obj->ping($host)) {
            print RED . "Ping test for \'$host\' failed" . RESET . "\n";
        }

        $ping_obj->close();
    }
} while ($config{$config_tag}{host} eq 'undef');

This is what the template hash looks like.

my %template = (
    host => 'undef',
    port => 'undef',
    login => {
        user => 'undef',
        password => 'undef',
    },
    options => {
        snapshots => "0",
        compress => "0",

        # This is expressed as an array
        exclude => 'undef',
    },
);
share|improve this question
1  
What is this supposed to do: eq 'undef'? I hope you are not trying to check if that value is undefined, because that's not what that does. –  TLP Dec 22 '11 at 0:41
    
I am checking if it is undef but the hash where it is checking is hardcoded with the value undef. –  Solignis Dec 22 '11 at 1:18
    
No, no, no.. You are either checking if it is 'undef' (the string), or undef as in "not defined". The way you are phrasing it is ambiguous. –  TLP Dec 22 '11 at 1:26
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3 Answers

If there is ever a use for a goto LABEL statement in Perl, this is it.

do {
    START:     # could also go right before the "do"
    ...
    if (...) {
        warn "Configuration exists. Start over.\n";
        goto START;
    }
} while (...);
share|improve this answer
    
If enclose the label inside the loop, the label will be destroyed when the loop is finished, right? –  Solignis Dec 22 '11 at 1:19
    
@Solignis - not right. The scoping rules for labels are kind of complicated -- see the perldoc for the details -- but it would be possible to goto START from either before or after this do-while loop. (That would not be a good place to use goto) –  mob Dec 22 '11 at 3:25
    
perl -e'do{START: } while (0);goto START' on 5.14 prints out Use of "goto" to jump into a construct is deprecated at -e line 1. (many times). I fully expect that it will no longer work when 5.18 comes out. In fact, after 5.16 comes out I think I might bring it up on p5p. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 22 '11 at 5:08
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Why do you have 3 elsifs where a simple else would do?
I mean, they only test for the exact opposite of what the associated if tested for.

if ($host eq '') {
    ...
} elsif ($host ne '') {
    ...
}
if ($config{$_}{host} ne $host) {
    ...
} elsif ($config{$_}{host} eq $host) {
    ...
}
if ($ping_obj->ping($host)) {
    ...
} elsif (! $ping_obj->ping($host)) {
    ...
}

I would use a normal while loop, instead of a do{...}while(...) loop.

do{
  RESTART:
  if(...){
    goto RESTART;
  }
}while(...);

vs

while(...){
  if(...){
    redo;
  }
}

In this loop you are only using the keys of %config to find the associated value, so why don't you use values %config instead.

foreach (keys %config) {
    if ($config{$_}{host} ne $host) {
        last;
    } elsif ($config{$_}{host} eq $host) {
        warn "Configuration for $host already exists!\n";
    }
}

vs

for( values %config ){
  if( $_->{host} ne $host ){
    ...
  } else {
    ...
  }
}

If you're using 5.10.0 or later you could use a smart match (~~) instead, which would make it clearer what you're testing.

my @hosts = map{ $_->{host} } values %config;
if( $host ~~ @hosts ){
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
%config points to keys not values. %config=>server##=>host=>$address server## is the keys I need to pull using the loop. So unless I am very mistaken using values %config would do nothing for me. –  Solignis Dec 22 '11 at 4:13
1  
@Solignis In the code you included in your question, you never used the keys for anything other than getting the values that were associated with them. If you had, I would have posted something else. map { $_->{host} } values %config is the same as map{ $config{$_}{host} } keys %config, which is effectively what you were doing. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 22 '11 at 4:25
    
Oh I see, so the values of %config are server##? Right? –  Solignis Dec 22 '11 at 4:35
    
@Solignis Lets say %config consisted only of this element $config{server1}={ host => B } then keys %config would return server1, and values %config returned { host => B }. Since you were only using the key like this: $config{$key}{host}, you didn't really need to know the key, and instead you could do $value->{host}. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 22 '11 at 4:42
    
I see, well the problem is %config{server1} has more than 1 value, I will post the template hash I use so you can see what I mean. –  Solignis Dec 22 '11 at 4:47
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I'm not sure why you are trying to use do ... while, when while seems more natural.

Some notes:

  • You do not need to double check your if-statements. If e.g. $host eq '' is true, then $host ne '' must be false. Per definition.
  • If you are not going to use $host outside the loop, which I assume you are not, since you store it in the hash, you should put my $host inside the loop, to restrict the scope.

Some tips:

  • You can use redo to restart the loop.
  • You can use smart matching to do away with the for loop.

while ($config{$config_tag}{host} eq 'undef') {
    print "Enter the hostname or IP of the ESXi server: ";
    chomp(my $host = <STDIN>);
    if ($host eq '') {
        print "You must enter a hostname or IP address!\n";
        redo;
    } else {
        # We need to catch duplicate configurations 
        my @host_list = map { $_->{host} } values %config 
        if ($host ~~ @host_list) {
            warn "Configuration for $host already exists!\n";
            redo;
        }
    }
    if ($ping_obj->ping($host)) {
        $config{$config_tag}{host} = $host;
    } else {
        print RED . "Ping test for \'$host\' failed" . RESET . "\n";
    }
    $ping_obj->close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
my @host_list = map{ $_->{host} } values %config –  Brad Gilbert Dec 22 '11 at 1:23
    
@BradGilbert Thank you. I guess I was a bit too eager with the delete button when I rewrote the code. –  TLP Dec 22 '11 at 1:29
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