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I need to compile code on my linux system. This is simple code and I don't know what's wrong:

I have this code and I can't compile it:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string char1, char2, char3, char4, char5, char6;
    cout<<"Hello this is your standard True and False quiz"<<endl;
    cout<<"Please enter 'T' or 'F'"<<endl;
    cout<<"No#1 George Washington invented the toilet?"<<endl;
    cin>>char1;
    if ( char1 != "T" || "F")
    {
        cout<<"You entered an incorrect character please reenter True of False"<<endl;
        cin>>char1;
    }
    if ( char1 != "T" || "F")
    {
        cout<<"You entered an incorrect character please reenter True of False"<<endl;
        cin>>char1;
    }
    if ( char1 == "T" )
    {
        cout<<"You entered the incorrect answer. The answer is False"<<endl;
    }
    cout<<"No#2 The Squareroot of 3136 is 56?"<<endl;      
    cin>>char2;
    if ( char2 != "T" || "F")
    {
        cout<<"You entered an incorrect character please reenter True of False"<<endl;
        cin>>char2;
    }
    if ( char2 != "T" || "F")
    {
        cout<<"You entered an incorrect character please reenter True of False"<<endl;
        cin>>char2;
    }
    if ( char2 == "F" )
    {
        cout<<"You entered the incorrect answer. The answer is True"<<endl;
    }
    cout<<"No#3 
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
} 

When I try to compile it:

gcc file.c

I get:

test.c:1: fatal error: iostream: No such file or directory
compilation terminated.

As far as I know, I have all the libraries needed, what am I doing wrong?

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8  
4  
-1 your code is not C. –  R.. Dec 22 '11 at 1:21
1  
@R well i got that, sorry if i am not as smart as you –  Joanna Lancaster Dec 22 '11 at 1:51
3  
@dreamlax: It's used once, at the end of the program, most likely so that someone can see the results when clicking the "run" button in their IDE. Quit acting like it's the most horrible thing ever, cause it's not. As far as what it does, i'd rather see a system("PAUSE") than a C++ function that does the exact same thing, because neither one of them is going to be in a real (non-school, non-learning) program -- and if someone has to take time to write "press any key" code, that's time they're not using to solve a real problem. –  cHao Dec 22 '11 at 3:13
1  
@cHao: I know I'm getting rather unjustifiably worked up over this, but it's only because I know someone who teaches C++ as a profession and encourages the use of system("pause") (amongst other less-portable/implementation-defined things) and has no knowledge of more important principles such as RAII. When I see system("pause") I immediately think of this person and it enrages me that he somehow still has a job and many people are learning poor coding practices from him. system("pause") is just the tip of iceberg with this guy. Mix this with excessive global variables, void main() ... –  dreamlax Dec 22 '11 at 21:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You are trying to compile C++ with a C compiler. Try g++ file.c instead.

Also, it's good practice to name your file file.cpp instead - naming it .c won't stop it compiling, but it will help tools like make. Also, it'll help others who come across your source code later (including yourself).

Edit: Your code has some other problems which aren't related to your question, but you'll run in to them as soon as you get it to compile:

  1. Your ( char1 != "T" || "F") should be ( char1 != "T" && char1 != "F") (note the && instead of ||)
  2. You're reading another character when you get bad input, but because your code has no loops, the program will exit before it does anything with the next character.
  3. As David Schwartz points out, it's worth removing system("PAUSE")

These are pretty common mistakes for newbies to C (Welcome! I'd recommend starting with some tutorials or introductory books. Here is an excellent list of C books and tutorials).

If you run in to anything you can't solve on your own, feel free to open another question.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your help –  Joanna Lancaster Dec 22 '11 at 1:41
2  
I was actually surprised to discover that g++ file.c treats file.c as C++ code rather than C code. I suppose it makes sense, but it's not obvious. The best advice is to both use g++ and to use the right suffix for the language (typically .cpp, but others possible). –  Keith Thompson Dec 22 '11 at 3:42

That is C++ code, not C, and must be compiled accordingly. (It also has numerous logical errors, but we can worry about that later.)

share|improve this answer

You have C++ code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
/* ... */

But are trying to compile it as if it were C:

gcc file.c

C++ is not C and you shouldn't treat it as if it were.

Try renaming your file to file.cpp and use g++ instead of gcc:

g++ file.cpp
share|improve this answer
    
The file renaming isn't strictly necessary but the changed name would let you use make more effectively. –  sarnold Dec 22 '11 at 0:11
1  
Some compilers choose how to interpret a file based on the extension (if it is not told what language it is in otherwise). –  dreamlax Dec 22 '11 at 1:08
    
That seems like a completely reasonable optimization to make. :) –  sarnold Dec 22 '11 at 1:09

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