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so out of the following 3 examples that do the same thing i really lean towards the first but is it really overkill and an abuse of linq to do things that way where you can create it all as an expression

  var Rand = new Random();
        Hosts = "abcdef".Select(x =>
                    {
                        return new HostMachineToUpdate(x + "_Host",
                            Enumerable.Range(1, Rand.Next(3, 8))
                            .Select(y => new VirtualMachineToUpdate(x + y.ToString() + "_VM")).
                            ToList()
                            );
                    }
                )
                .ToList();

        //traditional
        Hosts = new List<HostMachineToUpdate>();
        for (int x = (int)'a'; x < (int)'e'; x++)
        {
            var Guests = new List<VirtualMachineToUpdate>();
            for (int y = 1; y < (new Random().Next(3, 8));y++ )
            {
                Guests.Add(new VirtualMachineToUpdate((char)x + y.ToString() + "_VM"));
            }
            Hosts.Add(new HostMachineToUpdate((char) x + "Host",Guests));
        }

        //very traditional.
        Hosts = new List<HostMachineToUpdate>();
        int lower = (int)'a';
        int upper = (int)'e';
        for (int x = lower; x < upper; x++)
        {
            List<VirtualMachineToUpdate> Guests = new List<VirtualMachineToUpdate>();
            int randomItemNum = new Random().Next(3, 8);
            for (int y = 1; y < randomItemNum; y++)
            {
                string vmname = (char)x + y.ToString() + "_VM";
                VirtualMachineToUpdate vm = new VirtualMachineToUpdate(vmname);
                Guests.Add(vm);
            }
            string hostname = (char)x + "Host";
            HostMachineToUpdate host = new HostMachineToUpdate(hostname, Guests);                
            Hosts.Add(host);
        }
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2  
which do you prefer to read and maintain? –  Mitch Wheat Dec 22 '11 at 0:58
2  
Are you finding that your random numbers aren't all that random? You are creating many Random instances. They're seeded from the clock. If the clock hasn't moved along next time you new one up... what then? It'll be seeded with the same value as last time. Use a single Random instance, don't new one up every time you need a random number. (First form every time for me, btw. I hardly every loop since Linq) –  spender Dec 22 '11 at 0:59
    
i prefer the first by far for readability, maintainability , that's how i think in a variety of languages however i think it will confuse coworkers etc who are unfamiliar with this sort of thing. –  klumsy Dec 22 '11 at 17:59
    
For a fair comparison of the three solutions I would recommentd changing the for (int x = (int)'a'; x < (int)'e'; x++) statement into a foreach as that then gets rid of the (char) cast in the other two methods. –  jussij Dec 23 '11 at 0:22
    
Also why does the first LINQ solution select these characters: "abcdef" while the two for loop solutions only select these characters: "abcd" –  jussij Dec 23 '11 at 0:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I personally don't like the amount of casting used in your traditional solution.

Is all the casting actually needed ?

Wouldn't this (untested) code also do what is required?

    // traditional.
    Hosts = new List<HostMachineToUpdate>();
    foreach (char x in "abcd")
    {
        List<VirtualMachineToUpdate> Guests = new List<VirtualMachineToUpdate>();
        int randomItemNum = new Random().Next(3, 8);
        for (int y = 1; y < randomItemNum; y++)
        {
            Guests.Add(new VirtualMachineToUpdate(x + y.ToString() + "_VM"));
        }
        Hosts.Add(new HostMachineToUpdate(x + "Host", Guests));
    }
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thanks. i decided to go and remove the casting from my original linq based one based on what you are doing, so now it starts with "abcdef".Select(x => .... ) –  klumsy Dec 22 '11 at 17:54

I prefer the declarative approach, so something like the first option. But I would rather use the C# syntax. Something vaguely like:

(from x in Enumerable.Range('a', 'e'-'a')
 select new HostMachineToUpdate(
    (char)x + "_Host",
    (from y in Enumerable.Range(1, new Random.Next(3,8))
     select new VirtualMachineToUpdate((char)x + y.ToString() + "_VM")).ToList())
 .ToList();

It feels close. May be a missing ( or ).

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c# syntax? Both forms are c# syntax. –  spender Dec 22 '11 at 1:04
    
Of course they are. One just uses linguistic extensions to write it as an expression, where the other uses method calls. My point is simply that the form I used feels - to me - less obscure, now that I have gotten comfortable with the syntax. –  drdwilcox Dec 22 '11 at 13:12

If each of your solutions executes fast enough for your needs, then it is safe to say that the machine cannot tell the difference between these options.

The important consideration devolves down to how expressive or clear is the code to a human reader because in the future someone will have to understand, debug or extend the code. In the above case, try this out. Leave the code alone for two weeks. When you return, decide which of the options is easiest to understand.

For myself this is a reality check. In the past I have been proud of writing some clever code, but in reality a simpler solution was the right solution.

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