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Is the main purpose of sprites to reduce http requests made to the server for graphical elements on a page? Or do you want to try and fit as many elements to the sprite as possible.

I guess what I'm asking is: when is the sprite too large?

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8 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It's too large when the user has to wait for the file to download before the page can be used.

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If you are using PNG for the sprite image type it's helpful to remember that each row is generally compressed (deflated) independently of the other rows.

So to help with the balance of number of sprites/image size, try to fit similar sprites next to each other horizontally rather than vertically - to take advantage of the compression.

PNG also supports "predictors" which only store the deltas between a predicted value (based on preceding rows and preceding pixels in the same row) and the actual value.

Find a good image editor that allows you to set different PNG predictor compression settings (or optimizes automatically) to find a setting that is best for your image.

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"Find a good image editor that allows you to set different PNG predictor compression settings (or optimizes automatically) to find a setting that is best for your image." In practice this means Save for web in Photoshop. –  Wolfr May 24 '09 at 20:23
    
pngcrush is worth a go — I’ve seen it reduce file sizes of PNGs saved with PhotoShop’s Save for Web command. It brute-forces the problem, trying lots of different compression settings, and seeing which results in the smallest file. Acorn on the Mac uses pngcrush automatically when you save PNGs for the web. –  Paul D. Waite Feb 25 '10 at 8:28
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For quick, bulletproof png compression on OS X, check out ImageOptim: imageoptim.com –  Doug Avery Jun 17 '12 at 18:19
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Is the main purpose of sprites to reduce http requests made to the server for graphical elements on a page?

Yes, you want to avoid having many requests for small images. Combining them into one sprite allows them to be fetched in one http request.

when is the sprite too large?

It's really the total of all requests you want to look at. The only way for the sprite to be too large is if the sum of its parts (which is exactly what the sprite is) is too large to begin with.

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Regarding sprites, you should definitely check out the discussion on memory usage beneath this blog post too: http://blog.mozilla.com/webdev/2009/03/27/css-spriting-tips/

My advice:

  • Only sprite icon rows, buttons and repeating images (e.g. a rounded corner gradient box).
  • Leave everything else alone
  • Keep your images under 500x500 or 100kb and leave as little unused space as possible. Use .png or .gif depending on the situation
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You can pack all small static design elements to one master image without big problems.

Of course, if you have 10 megapixel photos on your web site, packing them together would be madness.

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If you have 10 megapixel photos as a static element on every page on your site, that's madness anyway. –  Paul Tomblin May 13 '09 at 19:19
    
What if it is a photographer home page with samples of work? –  User May 13 '09 at 19:29
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@Mastermind: If I was the photographer, I'd still make smaller images for the website, reserving the full-rez images for separate, explicit download. But that's just me.... –  RolandTumble May 13 '09 at 20:56
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A CSS sprite is too large when you're including anything but the essential UI elements. These are small supplementary images like icons and logos where compression doesn't damage the quality too much. Since all those images would have been otherwise independently loaded, you're no worse off than requesting them individually. If it is taking too long to load, your problem doesn't rely with sprites, but in compressing your images properly.

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Yes the main purpose is to reduce requests (and therefor loading time). Another advantage is that you only have to worry about one image to be cached correctly. Tip: use PNG images as their compression handles large white ("empty") areas best.

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Google maps uses 256x256 px images.

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