Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It might be the lack of sleep,

I do not get in what order the rectangle is constructed. length first then height?

And why are the cin>> values used as the amount of * to output if the only cout<< indicated is "*"?

I know it's noob stuff for a lot of you, so please explain it like I was a 5 yo :D

The code was edited, again, in english this time. Thank you for pointing that error, need more coffee :/

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void drawRectangle ( int l, int h )
{
for ( int line (0); line < h; line++ )
{
    for ( int column (0); column < l; column++ )
    {
        cout << "*";
    }

     cout<<endl;
}
}
int main()
{
int length, height;
cout << "Length for rectangle : ";
cin >> length;

cout << "Height for rectangle : ";
cin >> height;

drawRectangle (length, height);

return 0;
}

UPDATE 1:

Thank you to all who answered, even when the code was messed up. I just want to make sure I understand:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void drawRectangle ( int l, int h )

{
for ( int line (0); line < h; line++ ) //this is the outer loop
{
for ( int column (0); column < l; column++ ) //this is the inner loop
{
    cout << "*";
}
cout<<endl; //the length is written then jumps here to break.

/*So, the outer loop writes the length,from left to right, jumps to the cout<<endl; for a line break, then the inner loop writes the height under each "*" that forms the length?/*

UPDATE 2: Got my answer right here http://www.java-samples.com/showtutorial.php?tutorialid=326

I guess this mystery is solved! Thank you to everyone that answered my question :) I appreciate your help!

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by tibur, Voo, Verbeia, phooji, Cody Gray Dec 22 '11 at 5:25

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I don't think this is proper syntax: for (int line(0); line < h; line++) }. Is a brace in the wrong position? –  Ted Hopp Dec 22 '11 at 2:16
21  
so please explain it like I was a 5 yo: When a mommy for loop and a daddy for loop love each other very much, they nest inside each other and produce a compilation error: Line 13: error: expected primary-expression before '}' token When you're older, son, you'll learn how to post code that compiles. –  ta.speot.is Dec 22 '11 at 2:16
    
@todda.speot.is: That was an awesome explanation. Perhaps he took an arrow to the knee. –  AusCBloke Dec 22 '11 at 2:22
    
I'm surprised no-one's complained about how inefficient the chosen algorithm is. It would be much wiser to construct an std::string of l asterisks and a newline, then print it h times. Bonus points for constructing the whole output string first, but only if l and h are guaranteed to be sufficiently small. More efficiency points if you skip std::string and go straight for a char array. –  ta.speot.is Dec 22 '11 at 2:25
    
Code's been edited to be in a different language! First time I've seen that before. And I'm not talking C++ to VB. –  ta.speot.is Dec 22 '11 at 2:30
show 3 more comments

3 Answers

Very messy code you have there.

void drawRectangle(int l, int h)
{
     for ( int column = 0; column < l; column++ )
     {
         for ( int line = 0; line < h; line++ )
         {
             cout << "*";
         }
         cout<<endl;
     }
}

Since the console output goes from left to right, you have to output the lenth first. You do this by putting cout << "*" into the inner loop. The outer loop puts a line break after your length was written. The ouput would look like:

****************
****************
****************
****************

with length=16 and height=4

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, please see my updated question:) –  WellWellWell Dec 22 '11 at 3:27
add comment

It doesn't actually construct anything, since it doesn't compile. :/

Changing drawRectangle to the following (by putting the braces where they should be) will make it compile and run (however what you consider to be the length and height are back to front):

void drawRectangle( int l, int h )
{
     for ( int column (0); column < l; column++ )
     {
         for ( int line (0); line < h; line++ )
         {
            cout << "*";
         }

         cout<<endl;
     }
}

Assume l is 5 and h is 4 (drawRectangle(5, 4)). The outside for loop will iterate 5 times, creating 5 rows. Now for each of those rows, the inside for loop iterates 4 times, and prints a '*' at each iteration (therefore **** is printed for each row). Once the inner for loop terminates, a new line is printed, and the outside one continues until it has iterated 5 times.

And you get:

****
****
****
****
****
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, please see my updated question:) –  WellWellWell Dec 22 '11 at 3:27
add comment

The { syntax is a bit wrong in the loops.

To answer your question the rectangle is draw with a number of * starting on column 1 drawing the whole row like this:

*    *    *
*    *    *
* => * => *
*    *    *
*    *    *

this is a length = 3 and height = 5 rectangle.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, please see my updated question:) –  WellWellWell Dec 22 '11 at 3:27
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.