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I have simple base class with single static field. I have numerous classes that derive from this base class. When I create a derived class, it causes invocation of the base classes static ctor which initializes the static field (Works as expected). The problem is that when I create another derived class, that inherits from same base, the static field in the base is still null, why???? It was initialized by the first class I instantiated.

Should not static fields in base classes have global allocation and be visible (ie. shared) to all derived classes?

My model:

class Base<T>
{

 protected static object s_field = null;

 static Base { s_field = new object(); }
}

class Derived1<T> : Base<T>
{

}

class Derived2<T> : Base<T>
{

}

// ... later in the program

Derived1<int> instance1 = new Derived1<int>(); // initializes static field (s_field in base class) for all derived types

Derived2<double> instance2 = new Derived2<double>(); // the static field is null

(I can see this through the debugger, but should it not already have been initialized by previous line??)

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1  
Please don't prefix your titles with "C# .net - ". That's what the tags are for. –  John Saunders Dec 22 '11 at 2:26
    
@ActiveX Is this the only line of execution your program can take? Is it possible that somewhere between the instantiation of instance1 that the static field is set to null, at which point the instance2 object appears to have a null value? This could be validated possibly just by comparing the 2 objects at the same time, if one is null and the other is not, then you've left something out. –  Feisty Mango Dec 22 '11 at 2:27
3  
it should and it is. I just tried your snippet and the static field is not null. So whatever you are observing, its cause is not in the code posted here –  Pencho Ilchev Dec 22 '11 at 2:27
    
There's more going here since these types are used by Caslte Active Record library but I would not think that it would nullify my static fields during its initialization. Let me try and create my objects outside the framework. I'll report shortly. –  ActiveX Dec 22 '11 at 2:33
    
I realized my mistake! Wow, the base class is actually a template class: Base<T>. When I create object of the base like this new Derived<int>(), new Derived<double>(), new Derived<object>(), these are completely different types and therefore the static field rules are different, my understanding is that the static field will be allocated for family of type T. Is my understanding on this correct? Please confirm. –  ActiveX Dec 22 '11 at 2:45
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you have changed your code i believe you need to understand how generics works in .NET.

Static in generics behaves a bit different than in normal cases. For each unique open type T you provide, the base class maintains unique static member value.

You create another instance of open type double for the same base class via Derived < double > then youll see the concept what i am talking about.

Here a sample code to demonstrate more clearly :

public class Base<T>
    {
        public static string str = null;

        static Base()
        {
            str = "hello";

            Console.WriteLine("Ctor cald");
        }
    }

    public class Derived1<T> : Base<T>{}
    public class Derived2<T> : Base<T> { }

    public partial class Program
    {
         public static void Main()
        {
            Derived1<int> derv = new Derived1<int>();
            Derived2<double> derv2 = new Derived2<double>();
            Derived2<double> derv3 = new Derived2<double>();


            Console.ReadKey();
        }      
    }  

Here you shall see only 2 calls for the static Ctor.

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I realized my mistake! Wow, the base class is actually a template class: Base<T>. When I create object of the base like this new Derived<int>(), new Derived<double>(), new Derived<object>(), these are completely different types and therefore the static field rules are different, my understanding is that the static field will be allocated for family of type T. I have corrected the example above to reflect this (in the initial post).

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FYI, you need to quote angle brackets. Select the code and press Control-K. I've done this for you. –  John Saunders Dec 22 '11 at 19:57
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Whole question changes when you put generics into the picture. Your understanding on inheritance of static members works as expected without generics and when Generics are in places, still the concept is valid with the exception that, Generics creates different types at run time. Base<int> and Derived1<int> share the same static member where as Derived1<decimal> would be a different type than Base<int> at run time which doesn't share the static member with.

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