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I am aware that this topic has been covered already in many places, but while going through the different answers, I could not find a solution that fits my case.

Basically what I am trying to do is very simple. I have a view controller with a table view, and a + button that fires a second view controller where the user can enter, say a name, and this name is then added to the first view controller table view. Think about Contacts on the iPhone where you can add a new person (or Amazon where you can add a new credit card).

My question is - what is the best way to return this string (in this case) back to the view controller where the table is?

People suggested using NSDefaults, Delegate, or singleton none of which are really good for this case (each one for its own reason). I really just need to return a simple string.

Thank you for your help.

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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's what you need to do (please note I am typing this off the top of my head so the compiler may have some issues with my syntax).

In your child view controller interface:

@protocol ChildDelegate <NSObject>
- (void)didConfirmName:(NSString*)name
@end

@interface ChildViewController : UIViewController
...

@property (nonatomic, assign) id<ChildDelegate> delegate;

And implementation, inside the method called when the user confirms whatever they need to confirm:

- (void)myCustoMethod
{
    ...
    if ([self.delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(didConfirmName:)])
        [self.delegate didConfirmName:NAME_STRING];
}

And in your parent view controller, when you are instantiating the child view controller, assign SELF as the delegate:

ChildViewController *vc = [[ChildViewController alloc] init...];
vc.delegate = self;

And implement:

- (void)didConfirmName:(NSString*)name
{
    // Do whatever you want with the name here...
}

Also make sure you tell the compiler that you are implementing the protocol :

@interface ParentViewController () <ChildDelegate>
@end
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It is the only "correct" way That's simply not true. There are a number of valid approaches to sharing data between objects; delegation is far from the only "correct" way. –  Caleb Dec 22 '11 at 5:05
    
Fair enough, I will edit my answer to remove that because you are right. –  Rog Dec 22 '11 at 5:14
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If you are navigating from View Controller A ---> View Controller B, which is your case here, and then you want to pass information from B -> A, it is recommended to use a loose coupling, like delegation. There are a couple of things as you discussed, like NSUserDefaults, singleton, NSNotification, and may be many more.

But delegation is the better and standard approach to do it.

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You don't return the new thing to the TableView. What you need is to update the source of information that feeds your tableView.
So where the data live is the place you need to go and add it, when you will come back to the UITableViewController you may need to tell the UITableView to reload it's data.

There is a handle on each UIViewController to it's parent if you absolutely need to communicate with it.

UIViewController *parentVC = aViewController.parentViewController;
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can you please provide a sample code? its not really clear how I do that. for the sake of simplicity, lets assume there is not a table view in the root view, just a simple string that needs to be updated. –  TommyG Dec 22 '11 at 3:38
    
trying that and it doesnt work. looks like i need to do some casting (See stackoverflow.com/questions/956990/…) which is not enough by the way, cause i cant seem to be able to "write" the string back to the parent VC. –  TommyG Dec 22 '11 at 3:55
    
Just be mindful that if you are using a navigation controller, the parentViewController returned will be the actual nav controller as opposed to the previous view controller. You should use delegate in this instance, it's the simplest and most correct for your needs. –  Rog Dec 22 '11 at 4:36
    
+1 thanks for the help –  TommyG Dec 22 '11 at 5:16
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Assuming that the ViewController that needs to get updated is the root view controller of the app, you can do the following:

YourViewController * yvc = [(YourAppDelegate *)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] viewController];

[yvc updateString:@"Updated String"];

Remember to:

#import "YourAppDelegate.h"

But Honestly I would use the delegate pattern or a NSNotification.

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This is incorrect, the viewController method/property doesn't even exist for <UIApplicationDelegate>. –  Rog Dec 22 '11 at 4:39
1  
Off course it doesn't exits, but normally in your app delegate you store a reference to the rootViewController of your app, you can call it viewController or whatever you want... –  Ecarrion Dec 22 '11 at 4:42
    
problem is often times the root view controller is a navigation controller, tab bar controller etc –  Rog Dec 22 '11 at 4:51
1  
I know, Thats Why I'm saying "Assuming that the ViewController that needs to get updated is the root view controller of the app" and then recommend the delegate pattern or an NSNotification –  Ecarrion Dec 22 '11 at 4:55
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Three good options:

1) Have the first view controller pass itself to the second view controller, so that the second controller can send messages to the first. Ideally, create a protocol that the first controller adopts, so that the second controller doesn't depend on the type of the first controller but only cares that it implements the protocol:

@protocol Nameable
@property(copy) NSString* name;
@end;

@interface FirstViewController <Nameable>
//...
@end

@implementation FirstViewController
@synthesize name;
//...
@end

Then the first controller can do this:

SecondViewController *second = [[SecondViewController alloc]
initWithNibName:nil]; second.thingToName = self;
[self.navigationController pushViewController:second animated:YES];

And when the time comes, the second controller can do this:

self.thingToName.name = nameString;

The details aren't really that important -- the main thing to know here is that if you want to send a message to an object, you first need a pointer to the object. When the first view controller sets second.thingToName = self, it's providing that pointer.

2) Have the first view controller create a data object in which the second view controller can store the data, like this:

@interface Person <Nameable>
//...
@end

@implementation Person
@synthesize name;
//...
@end

Now the first view controller can create a new Person and pass that:

SecondViewController *second = [[SecondViewController alloc]

Person *person = [[Person alloc] init];
[self.people addObject:person];
initWithNibName:nil]; second.thingToName = person;
[person release];

[self.navigationController pushViewController:second animated:YES];

This is similar to the first approach, only the thing that's receiving the name isn't the view controller here, it's some sort of data container (Person).

You can see the value of the protocol here, too -- notice that the SecondViewController class doesn't change at all between the first and second approaches. It doesn't care whether it's talking to a view controller or an instance of Person or anything else... as long as the thing implements the Nameable protocol, it's happy.

3) Reverse the direction of communication. Instead of making the second view controller send the string, have its parent get the string. This may well be the simplest solution, although it does require that the parent has some way to know that the child is done. It'd go something like this:

@implementation FirstViewController
//...

- (IBAction)addNewName:(id)sender
{
    self.secondController = [[SecondViewController alloc] initWithNibName:nil bundle:nil];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:self.secondController animated:YES];
}

- (void)viewWillAppear
{
    if (self.secondController != nil) { // we must be returning from the child
        self.name = self.secondController.name;
        self.secondController = nil;
    }
}
@end
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Passing the parent view controller to its child is never a good idea because it breaks encapsulation and it means you will not be able to reuse the child view anywhere else because it expects to be passed a controller with certain attributes. That's one of the main reasons protocols exist. –  Rog Dec 22 '11 at 4:40
    
@Rog There's nothing at all wrong with passing the parent view controller to the child. What's less than optimal is letting the child expect the thing passed to be the parent. And you're right -- that's why I defined the protocol Nameable above. Just to make it crystal clear, I'll add an interface for the parent that shows it adopting Nameable. –  Caleb Dec 22 '11 at 4:43
    
+1 thanks for the help. –  TommyG Dec 22 '11 at 5:16
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