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i need capture the last error on function "include" PHP.

I test with the functions "Exceptions", but unfortunately i have written above the function "include".

If I write after the function "include" does not show the exception.

Example 1:

try{
        throw new exception();
        require_once( $this->controller['path'] );
    }
    catch( exception $e )
    {
        print_r( error_get_last() );
    }

This Return: ...(Void)...

Example 2:

try{

        require_once( $this->controller['path'] ) OR throw new exception();;
    }
    catch( exception $e )
    {
        print_r( error_get_last() );
    }

This return: Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_THROW in...

I purposely created a syntax error in the file to include. The idea is to trap the error so that you can debug them.

Anyone have any idea how to get this?

Guys! I need to catch syntax errors. Greetings!

share|improve this question
    
Guys! I need to catch syntax errors. Greetings! –  Olaf Erlandsen Dec 22 '11 at 5:20
1  
@OlaErlandsenTriskel: You can't. Syntax errors fail at the tokenising level. Your code hasn't started to execute by then. You could include the file and run token_get_all() on the individual files. Not sure what happens if there was a parse error though (maybe an empty array)? –  alex Dec 22 '11 at 5:23
    
why do you want to test for the syntax errors? you have to do it at development time, not at run time –  Your Common Sense Dec 22 '11 at 5:29
1  
Personally I wouldn't bother with catching any and all errors like file inclusion errors. Including other required files is such a basic thing that something is fundamentally broken in your app layout if that doesn't work. The app should just die as quickly as possible with an error message if it doesn't even work at that level, which is exactly what require does. You just have to bootstrap the app at some point, including all needed dependencies is IMO part of that step. It does not fall into the "needs to be handled gracefully" category yet. –  deceze Dec 22 '11 at 5:45
1  
@Col If the app can't even find all its include files, it has obviously never been run. Code in that condition should never be seen by a user anyway. Usually this will cause the web server to throw up its Error 500 page, which you can customize. If you really want to handle this in PHP, see my answer. –  deceze Dec 22 '11 at 5:53

4 Answers 4

require_once is a language construct and not a function and you can't do short circuit with it.

To test if the file exists before you include it, you can use is_file(). If you want to test if the file is readable, you can use is_readable().

You may also want to use include which issues a E_WARNING if the file could not be found, not a E_COMPILE_ERROR.

share|improve this answer
    
he don't want to test if file exists, I believe, but rather if the file is readable... –  Your Common Sense Dec 22 '11 at 5:05
    
@Col.Shrapnel: Updated answer, thanks. –  alex Dec 22 '11 at 5:06
    
lol, it turned to be somewhat funny one. including implies reading, so, it turned to be "To test if the file is readable, you can use is_file(). If you want to test if the file is readable, you can use is_readable()." :) –  Your Common Sense Dec 22 '11 at 5:12
    
guy! i need to catch syntax errors, greetings! –  Olaf Erlandsen Dec 22 '11 at 5:21

i agree with alex, try to cath error with check the file_exists() then use an Exception

if(file_exists($this->controller['path'])){
    try{
       require_once( $this->controller['path'] );
    }catch(Exception $e){
          // throw error
    }
}

or use is_readable()

if(is_readable($this->controller['path'])){
    try{
       require_once( $this->controller['path'] );
    }catch(Exception $e){
          // throw error
    }
} 
share|improve this answer

First, if you use require, it's always going to kill your app if the file cannot be included. There's no control over the outcome, you cannot do anything afterwards. If you want to have control over the success of file inclusions, use include and test its return value.

$success = include "foo.php";
if (!$success) {
    // the file could not be included, oh noes!
}

You can have syntactical differences on that like:

if (!(include "foo.php")) ...

This will trigger an E_NOTICE if the file cannot be included, which you cannot catch. But that's OK, since it'll help you debug the issue and the display of errors will be turned off in production anyway (right, right?).

or throw new Exception doesn't work because throw is a statement and cannot be used where an expression is expected.


If you want to catch syntax errors in the included file, use php_check_syntax/it's successor php -l <file>.

share|improve this answer
    
this dont work with "syntax error" on include :S –  Olaf Erlandsen Dec 22 '11 at 5:58
    
Are you sure the syntax error is not in the included file?! Is this perhaps your question? –  deceze Dec 22 '11 at 5:59
    
I purposely created a syntax error in the file to include. The idea is to trap the error so that you can debug them. –  Olaf Erlandsen Dec 22 '11 at 6:04
    
@Olaf Then please clearly state that the syntax error is in the included file! See updated answer. –  deceze Dec 22 '11 at 6:08
    
sorry, thanks anyway –  Olaf Erlandsen Dec 22 '11 at 6:13

Most native PHP functions trigger errors rather than throwing exceptions. To convert PHP errors into exceptions you can set up a custom error handler:

function exceptions_error_handler($severity, $message, $filename, $lineno) { 
    throw new ErrorException($message, 0, $severity, $filename, $lineno); 
}
set_error_handler('exceptions_error_handler');

With this code you'll be able to catch all non-fatal errors as exceptions. Note that require_* functions throws fatal error, thus you'd have to use include instead.

As for handling syntax errors within the code itself, it is quite impossible, if you think about it a bit.

share|improve this answer
    
I used it, but I'm calling the function "include" from a class... –  Olaf Erlandsen Dec 22 '11 at 5:31
1  
So what? it works from anywhere. –  Your Common Sense Dec 22 '11 at 5:47

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