Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having a problem when passing nulls to a ExecuteCommand() method using linq. My code is similar to the one that follows:

    public void InsertCostumer(string name, int age, string address)
    {
        List<object> myList = new List<object>();

        myList.Add(name);
        myList.Add(age);
        myList.Add(address);

        StringBuilder queryInsert = new StringBuilder();
        queryInsert.Append("insert into Customers(name, address) values ({0}, {1}, {2})");

        this.myDataContext.ExecuteCommand(queryInsert.ToString(), myList.ToArray());
    }

But, when a parameter is null (address, for instance), I get the following error: "A query parameter cannot be of type 'System.Object'."

The error doesn't occur if no parameters are null. I know the design in my example is a little poor, I just created a simplified example to focus on the problem. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is a known bug and Microsoft does not intend to fix it...

https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/ViewFeedback.aspx?FeedbackID=305114&wa=wsignin1.0

The work around is to either:

  1. Drop into ADO.NET and execute the SQL Command directly
  2. Format the string you're executing yourself and call ExecuteCommand with an empty object array (new object[0])

The second isn't a good idea as it opens you up to SQL inject attacks, but its a quick hack.

share|improve this answer

Does the insert value need to actually be a String "null" instead of a null object?

share|improve this answer
    
It is a null value. No string "null" –  Samuel Carrijo May 13 '09 at 19:42
    
Just out of curiosity, just for debugging, I would make a string that has all the values populated and see what the formatted string value is prior to ExecuteCommand. –  Joel Cochran May 14 '09 at 14:28
    
It works well for populated strings. Only the null value throws the unwanted exception –  Samuel Carrijo May 26 '09 at 12:40

have you tried assigning a value to those that are null? Meaning (pseudo):

If address is null then address = "" or If age is < 0 then age = 0

then add it to myList

or you could always use a Ternary operator:

name = name.Length < 1 ? "" : name;
age = age < 1 ? Int32.MinValue : age;

then add it to myList

share|improve this answer
    
What if I have like 10 fields, or something like that. Must I validate them all. Also, my database accept null values, and I want to save them as null. I don't see using some other arbitrary value to replace null as a good practice –  Samuel Carrijo May 14 '09 at 13:10
    
I usually only validate the ones that could be NULL, so yes, you might need to do them all. I agree with you, if you in fact want to preserve the NULL then you wouldn't want my approach. Also, I wouldn't call it an arbitrary value because it really is just the min value the object can have and not some random meaningless value. –  northpole May 14 '09 at 15:02
    
What I'm trying to say is. Even if we take an empty string (or Int32.MinValue) and use it, there are other applications that save this as null (the customer didn't say his age, so it will be saved as null, considering every field is nullable). So, when explaining my DB to someone else, I'll say. Oh, if the customer doesn't provide his age, it will be null or Int32.MinValue, it depends on which application saved it (or the same for his address, which could be empty or null). Also, whoever reads this value will have a portion if (age == null || age == Int32.MinValue) :( –  Samuel Carrijo May 26 '09 at 12:51

why not use nullable values?

public void InsertCostumer(string? name, int? age, string? address)
{
    List<object> myList = new List<object>();

    myList.Add(name.GetValueOrDefault());
    myList.Add(age.GetValueOrDefault());
    myList.Add(address.GetValueOrDefault());

    StringBuilder queryInsert = new StringBuilder();
    queryInsert.Append("insert into Customers(name, address) values ({0}, {1}, {2})");

    this.myDataContext.ExecuteCommand(queryInsert.ToString(), myList.ToArray());
}
share|improve this answer
2  
It doesn't work when they are null –  Samuel Carrijo Jul 13 '09 at 14:33
    
ah of course - string is a reference type. oops. –  tim Jul 13 '09 at 17:35
    
i guess ur stuck with extension methods for strings, and ints can't be null. Oops @ prev. static void Main(string[] args) { test(null); } public static string test(string tester) { return tester.ToDefaultedString(); } } public static class Test { public static string ToDefaultedString(this String test2) { if (test2 != null) { return test2.ToString(); } else { return string.Empty; } } } –  tim Jul 13 '09 at 17:45

Same issue for me. So stupid of MS not to fix that. Here's my solution although I did not support all parameter types but ya get the idea. I stuck this in the DataContext class so it looks like it's built in to Linq :) .

    public int ExecuteCommandEx(string sCommand, params object[] parameters)
    {
        object[] newParams = new object[parameters.Length];

        for (int i = 0; i < parameters.Length; i++)
        {
            if (parameters[i] == null)
                newParams[i] = "NULL";
            else if (parameters[i] is System.Guid || parameters[i] is System.String || parameters[i] is System.DateTime)
                newParams[i] = string.Format("'{0}'", parameters[i]);
            else if (parameters[i] is System.Int32 || parameters[i] is System.Int16)
                newParams[i] = string.Format("{0}", parameters[i]);
            else
            {
                string sNotSupportedMsg = string.Format("Type of param {0} not currently supported.", parameters[i].GetType());
                System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(false, sNotSupportedMsg);
            }
        }

        return ExecuteCommand(string.Format(sCommand, newParams));
    }
share|improve this answer

I use something like this (note I'm using the SO "IDE" so I can't, guarantee this will compile or work correctly but you'll get the idea)

    public void InsertCostumer(string name, int age, string address)
    {
        List<object> myList = new List<object>();

        myList.Add(name);
        myList.Add(age);
        myList.Add(address);

        StringBuilder queryInsert = new StringBuilder();
        queryInsert.Append("insert into Customers(name, age, address) values (");
        int i = 0;
        foreach (var param in myList.ToArray())
        {
            if (param == null)
            {
                queryInsert.Append("null, ");
                myList.RemoveAt(i);
            }
            else
            {
                queryInsert.Append("{" + i + "}, ");
                i++;
            }
        }

        queryInsert.Remove(queryInsert.Length - 2, 2);
        queryInsert.Append(")");

        this.myDataContext.ExecuteCommand(queryInsert.ToString(), myList.ToArray());
    }
share|improve this answer

I made a generic ParamArray Function to pass in the parms I normally would pass into the ExecuteCommand. Then have it pass back the uninterpretted SQL parms and a list of objects actually passed in.

Public Sub CommitRecords(ByVal InItems As List(Of Item)
    Dim db As New DataContext(ConnectionString)
    Try
        For Each oItem In InItems 
            With oItem
                Dim strParms As String = ""
                Dim collParms = BuildExecuteCommandParms(strParms, .MapValue1, .MapValue2, .MapValue3, .MapValue4, .MapValue5, .MapValue6)

                db.ExecuteCommand("Insert Into ItemTable (Value1, Value2, Value3, Value4, Value5, Value6)" & vbCrLf & _
                                    "Values (" & strParms & ")", _
                                    collParms.ToArray)
            End With
        Next

    Catch ex As Exception
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message)
    End Try
End Sub

Public Function BuildExecuteCommandParms(ByRef strParms As String, ByVal ParamArray InParms As Object()) As List(Of Object)
    Dim i As Integer = 0
    Dim collOutParms As New List(Of Object)
    For Each oParm In InParms
        If i <> 0 Then strParms &= ", "
        If oParm Is Nothing Then
            strParms &= "NULL"
        Else
            strParms &= "{" & i & "}"
            collOutParms.Add(oParm)
        End If
        i += 1
    Next
    Return collOutParms
End Function
share|improve this answer

I usually use this sort of thing, not ideal but it's gets it done if you're stuck

            if (myObject != null)
            {
                foreach (var p in ct.GetType().GetProperties())
                {
                    if (p.GetValue(myObject , null) == null)
                    {
                        if (p.PropertyType == typeof(string))
                        {
                            p.SetValue(myObject , "Empty", null);
                        }
                        if (p.PropertyType == typeof(int))
                        {
                            p.SetValue(myObject , 0, null);
                        }
                        if (p.PropertyType == typeof(int?))
                        {
                            p.SetValue(myObject , 0, null);
                        }

                    }
                }
            }

This makes sure each value in the object has a value before you use the parameters in ExecuteCommand. Again, not ideal, but it works.

share|improve this answer

In .NET, a null/nothing string does not evaluate to an empty string, i.e. "". If you want "", then that has to be the value of the string, or if you want to represent null/nothing in SQL, you have to manually write out "NULL" if your .NET string is in fact null/nothing.

All the execute command does, is execute a SQL query, provide by you, as a String. it doesn't do anything else special in terms of that SQL string.

So, for the Execute Command to work, you have to pass in a valid SQL string, you have to manually construct the string correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
why was this marked down. especially since the resolution matches the accepted answer?? don't hit and run! –  andy Sep 10 '11 at 23:24
1  
Because the explanation of the answer makes no sense and has nothing to do with the actual cause of the problem. Look up the documentation of ExecuteCommand; it does a magic tric with query parameters called parameterization. –  ErikHeemskerk Sep 21 '11 at 11:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.