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I need to position divs within divs, and I am getting crazy. I've read many docs on the net, but I am still not clear about behavior of relative and absolute positioning when divs are embedded.

Someone came up with the following:

The best way I've found to understand absolute positioning is that position:relative looks "downstream" to child elements and position:absolute looks "upstream" to parent elements. That is, when you tell an HTML element to be absolutely positioned, it's going to look "up" to its parent elements until it finds one that is set to position:relative, and will position itself based on that. If it doesn't find one, it will position itself with respect to the by default.

Is this correct for all browsers? Is this a complete explanation?

My issue is that I have several divs embedded in several divs. I need to position some child div within a parent div, with high precision (for example top 33, left 9). The parent div can be embedded in a grand-parent div, with high precision too, etc...

How does one solve this issue for all browsers? Should I create a super relative parent div from which the whole hierarchy of div should be positioned as absolute?

EDIT

From current answers, I have an extra question: does one have to explicitly declare a relative or absolute position in each div to make positioning work? In other words, if a div does not have a relative or absolute position, it is not taken into account when computing positions?

FOR THE RECORDS

The answer to the above question is yes.

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Going to bed, will read tomorrow, I am dead... –  JVerstry Dec 22 '11 at 6:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I find it a little easier to understand this way:

If an item is position: relative, then any style settings for top, bottom, left, right positions are relative to where the item would have been in the normal layout flow. So:

position: relative;
top: 10px;

pushes an item 10px down lower than it would have otherwise been in the normal HTML layout.

If an item is position:absolute, then it is positioned relative to whatever the closest parent that is position: relative or position: absolute or relative to the body element if no parents meet that criteria. For example, if the immediate parent is `position: relative' and the child is:

position: absolute;
top: 10px;
left: 10px;

Then, the object will be positioned down and to the right by 10px from the upper left corner of the parent. When an object is position: absolute, it is removed from the layout of the page and it does not affect the layout of any other objects (except it's own children).

As an example, if you want to position three images on top of one another in a container object (perhaps so you can cycle through them in a slideshow, you would do so with this CSS:

.container {position: relative; height: 100px; width: 133px;}
.container img {position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;}
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Are you saying that I must explicitly declare a relative or absolute position in each div do create some kind of 'chain' in the hierarchy? In other words, if I don't do this, divs without explicit or relative declaration are bypassed when computing positions? –  JVerstry Dec 22 '11 at 12:29
    
A child who is position: absolute is taken out of the layout of the page and positioned absolutely. It ignores the position of any parent that is not relative or absolute itself. In answer to your question, you rarely need to create any sort of chain. The point of position: absolute is to escape the chain and position vs. one particular parent. If you want to keep everything relative to the chain of parents, then don't use position: absolute - just let it be in the normal layout and it will respect all parents. –  jfriend00 Dec 22 '11 at 15:52

Should I create a super relative parent div from which the whole hierarchy of div should be positioned as absolute?

Yes. Each absolutely-positioned element will be positioned within its closest ancestor that is itself absolutely or relatively positioned.

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I am going to repeat the following block again

The best way I've found to understand absolute positioning is that position:relative looks "downstream" to child elements and position:absolute looks "upstream" to parent elements. That is, when you tell an HTML element to be absolutely positioned, it's going to look "up" to its parent elements until it finds one that is set to position:relative, and will position itself based on that. If it doesn't find one, it will position itself with respect to the by default.

Yes you need to have a position relative to your absolute parent, say body, Later on down the code you can have your elements absolute positioned with respect to the parent.

All in all absolute position is a kind of pain, when it comes to different screen resolutions.

But the way to go is to have parent relative position and then child absolute.

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