Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Double Lock check in Singleton is generally written as :

public static Singleton getInstance()
{ 
    if (instance == null)
    {
        synchronized(Singleton.class) {  //1
            if (instance == null)          //2
                  instance = new Singleton();  //3
        }
    }
    return instance; //4
} 

In the code above, suppose ten threads are calling this method, all of them crossed the first if condition, then one thread enters into the synchronized block and creates the instances. Remaining 9 thread would come one by one even if the instance is created they need to wait and come in sequence through the synchronized block. I want that as soon as any of the threads creates the Singleton instance all the other threads should not wait. Tell me if there is some solution for this?

share|improve this question
1  
Bill Pugh is your hero : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – eSniff Dec 22 '11 at 6:03
    
@Mitch: That article is 9 years old. Double checked locking can work safely in any non-antique VM; it's however not the best way to instantiate a singleton. – Mark Peters Dec 22 '11 at 6:11
    
@Mitch: Ah! That's too bad, it's still a great and informative read, as long as you know it's not directly applicable today. Here it is again: ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-dcl/index.html. This follow up talks about the drawbacks of safe double-checked locking under the new memory model: ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp03304/#3.2 – Mark Peters Dec 22 '11 at 6:22
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I don't think there's a solution if you insist on using lazy instantiation. You could just create your singleton object when you declare the instance variable:

class Singleton {
    private static final instance = new Singleton();

    private Singleton() {} // prevent outside construction

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return instance; // no synchronization needed
    }
}

Thanks to the comment by eSniff (and the comment by yair to set me right about eSniff's comment), here's the method posted in Wikipedia for a thread-safe and lazy method:

class Singleton {
    private static class Holder {
        static final instance = new Singleton();
    }

    private Singleton() {} // prevent outside construction

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return Holder.instance; // no synchronization needed
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution is thread safe and lazy. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – eSniff Dec 22 '11 at 6:09
    
Thanks for the quick reply Ted, Do you know any other method using Concurrent package class to make it happen? – SAM Dec 22 '11 at 6:10
    
@eSniff - It's not exactly lazy: the singleton is created as soon as the class is loaded, which may be well before any calls to getInstance(). – Ted Hopp Dec 22 '11 at 6:19
    
@SunnyGupta - The Wikipedia article that eSniff linked to in his comment has several methods. I don't see how using the Concurrent package classes can help with this. – Ted Hopp Dec 22 '11 at 6:25
2  
@TedHopp - the instance is created as soon as the holder class is loaded. And that holder class, according to this pattern, is loaded only when invoking the getter, which makes it lazy initialization (ignoring hack attacks :) ). – yair Dec 22 '11 at 6:28

Did you test performance and reached the definite conclusion that you really need lazy initialization? If so, use the holder pattern:

public static class Singleton {
    private static class InstanceHolder {
        public static Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }

    private Singleton(){}

    public static Singleton getInstance() { 
        return InstanceHolder.instance;
    }
}

But, if you're not after decent performance test, than the most simple thing to do is to initialize the singleton in its instance declaration (eager initialization), like so:

public static class Singleton {
    public static Singleton instance = new Singleton();

    private Singleton(){}

    public static Singleton getInstance() { 
        return instance;
    }
}

These two patterns, allow to rely on the class loading process to assure any thread that uses Singleton views a consistent instance. This way you achieve two benefits: code is more readable and runs faster.

BTW, the Double-Check-Idiom isn't thread safe unless your Singleton.instance is declared volatile.

share|improve this answer
    
Can I change the behavior of Singleton by tweaking the classloader? This question is asked to me in one of the interviews. Do you guys have any idea in which direct interviewer was trying to point out? – SAM Dec 22 '11 at 6:31
    
I'm not sure I understand the "requirement", but you can load the singleton with different class loaders and thus have several singleton instances in the JVM... – yair Dec 22 '11 at 6:37

If your 10 thread are using this Singleton object at same time then it will create problem in manipulation every thread modified this object in same time. to avoid this we used synchronized keyword so at a time only one thread can access object of Singleton class. if you want all thread can access this object at same time then remove synchronized keyword.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not quite right. The only synchronization is around the double-check locking that surrounds creation of the singleton. After the singleton is created, calling getInstance() will not require any synchronization. – Ted Hopp Dec 22 '11 at 6:11
    
Can I change the behavior of Singleton by tweaking the classloader? This question is asked to me in one of the interviews. Do you guys have any idea in which direct interviewer was trying to point out? – SAM Dec 22 '11 at 6:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.