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What should be straight forward is not here and I couldnt find a way yet in spite of reading a lot.

I have a button which executes a time consuming function. So on clicking the button should show time elapsed in milliseconds in a label with an interval of 500 ms. And when the desired result is achieved I want the timer to stop. I dont just need the final time (the total time consumed) in a label, but the label should dynamically show the time being elapsed. My code would be:

    private void btnHistory_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Class1 c = new Class1();
        c.StartClock(ref label12);

        Utility.PopulateHistory(dgvRecords_history, _util); //time consuming function

        c.StopClock();
    }

And in Class1 I write this:

    internal void StartClock(ref Label l)
    {
        Timer t = new Timer();
        t.Interval = 500;
        t.Enabled = true;
        t.Tag = l;
        t.Tick += new EventHandler(t_Tick);
        t.Start();
    }

    int i;
    bool stop;
    void t_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (stop)
        {
            ((Timer)sender).Stop();
            return;
        }

        ((Label)((Timer)sender).Tag).Text = (++i).ToString();
    }

    internal void StopClock()
    {
        i = 0;
        stop = true;
    }

What happens is, the t_Tick event is fired only after the complete code under button event is fired. That is the tick event is fired after it goes through the StopClock function! I got no idea why on earth it should be that!

2 questions basically:

  1. How can my requirement be achieved in the right way to handle these? I know I should use other built in classes to evaluate performance, but this is just for display purpose. For this, what is the ideal approach?

  2. Why is my code not working?

EDIT: I have used here System.Windows.Forms Timer here, but the result is not any different with System.Timers Timer

share|improve this question
    
are you sure that t_Tick is only being fired ONCE? did you actually debug it? –  Shai Dec 22 '11 at 7:38
    
@Shai, no its fired continuously without stop after getting out from StopClock function. But since I have given an if clause to stop the timer, ya it stops the timer readily and hence ticks only once. Hope you get me –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 7:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that your long-running task is also running on the UI thread. So the timer can't fire and update the UI, since the thread is busy handling the long-running task.

Instead, you should use a BackgroundWorker to handle the long-running task.

In code:

private void btnHistory_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{ 
    Class1 c = new Class1(ref label12); 
    c.StartClock(); 

    var backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
    backgroundWorker.DoWork += (s, e) =>
        {
            // time consuming function
            Utility.PopulateHistory(dgvRecords_history, _util);
        };

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += (s, e) =>
        {
            c.StopClock();
        };

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
} 

As ChrisWue noted, since you now have the long-running task in a separate thread, it needs to invoke any access to the UI controls on the UI thread.

If your long-running task just needs some data from the UI to start, you can pass that data as parameter of RunWorkerAsync(). If you need to output some result data to the UI, you can do that in the handler of the RunWorkerCompleted event. If you occasionally need to update the UI as progress is being made, you can do that in the handler of the ProgressChanged event, calling ReportProgress() in your DoWork handler.

If none of the above are needed, you could use the ThreadPool, as in StaWho's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, in that case, what is a timer a really meant for? After all we generally execute the entire program on one thread right? –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 7:46
2  
@nawfal: Running code periodically. If you need multiple threads, you use multiple threads. This is completely orthogonal with a timer. –  Cody Gray Dec 22 '11 at 7:50
    
We often execute the entire program on one thread since it is easier to understand and manage. However, in this case you want two things happening at the same time: Run your long-running function and update the UI. You can either do that manually (i.e. in your function occasionally update the UI) or do it "automatically" via 2 threads. –  Daniel Rose Dec 22 '11 at 7:58
2  
@Daniel You should mention in your answer that it is not safe to access the UI from the background worker directly but all UI access needs to be marshalled back to the UI thread. –  ChrisWue Dec 22 '11 at 8:00
    
@DanielRose why is your code giving compilation error. Seems curly brackets are not implemented properly –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 8:53

Your time consuming function is blocking the main thread. You can use BackgroundWorker or below trick:

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        t.Tick +=new EventHandler(t_Tick);
        t.Interval = 500;
    }

    int timeElapsed = 0;
    System.Windows.Forms.Timer t = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();
    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        t.Start();
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((x) =>
        {
            TimeConsumingFunction();
        });

    }

    void TimeConsumingFunction()
    {
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
        t.Stop();
    }

    void t_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        timeElapsed += t.Interval;
        label1.Text = timeElapsed.ToString();
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
With a BackgroundWorker you can explicitly update the UI (in the ProgressChanged handler). If that isn't needed, you can use the ThreadPool instead. Note that in .NET 4.5 it will be even easier due to the new async API. –  Daniel Rose Dec 22 '11 at 8:01

Add the timer to the Components collection of the form. Or store the timer in a field in the class.

The timer is garbage collected because it is not longer reachable when your method returns.

I don't know about your long running code, but out should new run on a separate thread, or make calls to Application.DoEvents

(And remove the ref in your code, it is not used).

share|improve this answer
    
Let me see to that, thanks..i know about ref, but was being doubly cautious when I saw no response on the label –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 7:48
    
How to add a separately created timer to Controls collection? I tired with Controls.Add(), but it says Timer is not valid Control –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 7:56

@Dainel Rose's answer worked for me perfectly, but only if invalid cross thread operation is handled. I could do so like:

private void btnHistory_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{ 
    Class1 c = new Class1(ref label12); 
    c.StartClock(); 

    var backgroundWorker = new BackgroundWorker();
    backgroundWorker.DoWork += ((s, e) =>
        {
            // time consuming function
            Utility.PopulateHistory(dgvRecords_history, _util);
        });

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerCompleted += ((s, e) =>
        {
            c.StopClock();
        });

    backgroundWorker.RunWorkerAsync();
} 

And in the Utility class where the time consuming function runs,

    internal static void PopulateHistory(DataGridView dgv, Utility util)
    {
        SetDataGridView_History(dgv, util);
    }

    delegate void UpdateDataGridView_History(DataGridView dgv, Utility util);
    static void SetDataGridView_History(DataGridView dgv, Utility util)
    {
        if (dgv.InvokeRequired)
        {
            UpdateDataGridView_History updaterDelegate = new UpdateDataGridView_History(SetDataGridView_History);
            ((Form)util._w).Invoke(updaterDelegate, new object[] { dgv, util });
        }
        else
            //code that utilizes UI thread (long running process in my case)
    }

Thanks all who helped. I'm marking Daniel's answer..

share|improve this answer

You can achieve the same functionality using the stopwatch. Like this (i've included a couple of examples of what you can retreive from the timespan that gets returned in the Stopwatch).

System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
watch.Start();
LongRunningFunction();
watch.Stop();
string label = watch.Elapsed.ToString();
string label1 = watch.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds.ToString() 
share|improve this answer
1  
How would that dynamically update a label with the elapsed time during the LongRunningFunction call? I'd probably use a backgroundworker with a progress callback. –  Anders Forsgren Dec 22 '11 at 7:37
    
this is not what I'm looking for, it doesnt display the time ticking in a label, but just the final time –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 7:39
    
@AndersForsgren, can you give me a sample code to know about backgroundworker. And need I really go for something that complex, when its just a matter of toying with simple timers? But I dunno what went wrong with my timer! –  nawfal Dec 22 '11 at 7:40
    
It's probably not working because you're UI thread isn't being updated. In it's current state you would need an Applications.DoEvents() call. Like @AndersForsgren says, run the task in background worker, wire up to the ProgressChanged event. –  Carl Sixsmith Dec 22 '11 at 7:50
2  
@CarlSixsmith I think the answer from StaWho is what you are looking for, here are a few links to demos with progress bars (reporting time and reporting progress percent is almost the same thing) codeproject.com/Tips/83317/… techrepublic.com/blog/programming-and-development/… –  Anders Forsgren Dec 22 '11 at 10:01

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