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I have been trying to internationalise some XSLT and getting it to use properties files. I have gotten to the point where I think I have code that should work but I'm getting an error that I've found the cause of here: Java/XSLT Problem: Cannot find a matching 1-argument

I am, as it says, using saxon (version 8) and am trying to determine whether using code like this: xmlns:lcl="java:com.mycode.localisation.LocaleUtilities" xmlns:resource="java:java.util.ResourceBundle.getBundle('taskStrings', lcl:getCurrentLocale())"> ...

is part of 'standard' XSL or an unofficial/proprietary extension only supported by certain parsers. I need to know this as I need to provide a degree of flexibility in the parser used, and can only justify not supporting saxon if it does not support this because it isn't fully standards compliant.

The error it causes is this by the way

Cannot find a matching 1-argument function named
{java:java.util.ResourceBundle.getBundle('taskStrings', lcl:getCurrentLocale())}getString()
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Further digging has shown that saxon does support what I want, and the problems were arising from using instance methods, which causes complications. I have now re-done everything using only static method calls to keep things simple and everything works. –  user1111284 Dec 22 '11 at 15:35
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The java:x.y.z URI format is, as you suggest, not a standard but a convention adopted by several Java-based XSLT processors for defining bindings to Java methods. The detailed rules vary considerably from one processor to another. –  Michael Kay Dec 22 '11 at 17:56
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You can add an answer to your own question, if you find a solution like here. –  Peter V Mar 15 '12 at 21:27
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2 Answers

If you're trying to internationalize your XSLT, you could use the key() function and <xsl:key> element. You would probably need to convert your properties files into XML.

Of course, if you absolutely need to leave your properties files as is, you could write your own URIResolver with saxon that could read a properties file and return it AS xml to the XSL.

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Further digging has shown that saxon does support what I want, and the problems were arising from using instance methods, which causes complications. I have now re-done everything using only static method calls to keep things simple and everything works

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