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I'm teaching myself Perl and Regex by reading Jeffrey Friedl's excellent Mastering Regular Expressions.

While trying to solve the "A Small Mail Utility" exercise starting on page 53 I stumbled upon the problem of not knowing how to save the content of file into a variable starting from an offset.

So here's my (shortened) script.

my ($body, $line, $subject); 
$body = $line = $subject = "";

open(MYFILE, "king.in") || die("Could not open file!");    
# Read the file's content line by line
while ($line = <MYFILE>)
{   
    # An empty line marks the beginning of the body
    if ($line =~ m/^\s+$/ ) {
        # HERE IS THE ISSUE
        # Save the file content starting from the current line
        # to the end of the file into $body
        last; 
    }

    if ($line =~ m/^subject: (.*)/i) {
        $subject = $1;
    }
    # Parse additional data from the mail header
}
close(MYFILE);

print "Subject: Re: $subject\n";
print "\n" ;
print $body;

I did some online research but couldn't figure out how to put the remainder of the file (i.e., the email body) into the variable $body.

I figured out that I could get the current position within the file in bytes using $pos = tell(MYFILE);

Eventually I ended up with the working but unsatisfactory solution of putting the file's lines first into an array.

How do I save the file content starting from an offset (either as a line number or bytes) into $body?

Edit: My solution -as provided by vstm- is to use $body = join("", <MYFILE>) to read in the rest of the file when encountering the empty line that marks the beginning of the body. The whole script I wrote can be found here.

Although this works great for me now, I would still like to know how to say (elegantly) in Perl "give me lines x to z of this file".

Thanks for your advice everybody.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of stopping immediately, you could just set a flag that says "now I'm reading the body". Like that:

my $inbody = 0;

while ($line = <MYFILE>)
{   
    if($inbody) {
        $body .= $line;
        next;
    }
    # An empty line marks the beginning of the body
    if ($line =~ m/^\s+$/ ) {
        # HERE IS THE ISSUE
        # Save the file content starting from the current line
        # to the end of the file into $body
        $inbody = 1;
        next;
    }

    if ($line =~ m/^subject: (.*)/i) {
        $subject = $1;
    }
    # Parse additional data from the mail header
}

It's like a mini state-machine. First It's in the "header"-state and if the first empty newline is read it switches to the "body"-state and just appends the body to the variable.

Alternatively you could just slurp the rest of the MYFILE-handle into the body at the end of your original while-loop and before the close:

# This would be your original while loop, (I've just shortened it)
while ($line = <MYFILE>)
{   
    if ($line =~ m/^\s+$/ ) {
        last;
    }
    # Parse additional data from the mail header
}

# The MYFILE-handle is now still valid and at the beginning of the body
$body = join("", <MYFILE>);

# now you can close the handle
close(MYFILE);
share|improve this answer
    
$body = join("", <MYFILE>); did the trick perfectly, thanks a bunch. Out of curiosity: How do I say "Give me the lines from x to z of this file" in Perl? Would I have to put all the lines into an array first? – Matthias Braun Dec 22 '11 at 9:20

The variable $. will give you the line number of the current file handle. Documentation here.

If you want to get an offset in bytes in the file, you can use seek to set the file handle position. But usually, you don't really want to do that, unless bytes is actually your desired offset.

The easiest solution for this is probably using the input record separator. Setting it to undef will slurp the file, instead of reading it line-by-line:

my $text;
my $subject;
while (<MYFILE>) {
    if (/^subject: /i) {  # /i flag to ignore case
        $subject = $_;
    } elsif (/^\s*$/) {
        local $/;  
        $text = <MYFILE>;
    }
}

This will end the loop as well, since it has reached eof.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, setting the input record separator to undef works great as well. Is there a performance difference compared to join("", <MYFILE>)? – Matthias Braun Dec 23 '11 at 13:26
    
@mareser Creating a local copy IS a way to set it to undef. I dont know which solution performs better. If it is important you can always benchmark it. Search CPAN for the benchmark module. – TLP Dec 23 '11 at 16:03
    
Ah, I see. I prefer the join() method as it looks more familiar to me than $/ (I did some Python time). Besides that: Is there an elegant way to say "give me lines x to z of this file"? – Matthias Braun Dec 23 '11 at 17:44
    
@mareser I mentioned that in my answer. The variable $. will tell you which line you are on. – TLP Dec 23 '11 at 18:17

You can change the input record separator:

local $/;
$body = <MYFILE>;
share|improve this answer

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