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I’m having a very basic problem here which I was not able to find a solution to even though it must exist.

I have the following code:

public class Foo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String foo;
        if (foo != null) {
            System.out.println("foo");
        } else {
            System.out.println("foo2");
        }
    }
}

It gives me

''variable might not have been initialized''

. Why is it that I have to assign null explicitly and not all variables are initialized with null by default?

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2  
because that is the way things are ... –  Jarrod Roberson Dec 22 '11 at 9:18
1  
Only member variables at class level are automatically initialized if you don't initialize them explicitly; local variables are not automatically initialized. Those are just the rules of the Java programming language. –  Jesper Dec 22 '11 at 9:22

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It prevents you from accidentally using a local variable before it's been definitely assigned. This is a good thing - it helps to prevent bugs. It's a shame that it can't be done for fields (instance and static variables) - but other than final variables, the compiler doesn't know when you're going to read them vs when you're going to assign them - it can't tell the order in which you're going to call methods. Within a single method, it has much more information about the flow control, so can provide more checking for you.

If you want the value of a local variable to be null, why don't you just explicitly set it to null? That not only keeps the compiler happy - it makes it clear what your intentions are too.

See chapter 16 of the Java Language Specification for more details on definite assignment.

Here's an example of how it can prevent bugs:

Iterable<String> collectionOfNames = ...; // Some method call
String lastNameInCollection;
for (String name : collectionOfNames)
{
    lastNameInCollection = name;
}
System.out.println("The last name was: " + lastNameInCollection);

What should happen if the collection is empty? Maybe we want to print "The last name was: null" - but maybe we should do something else. The fact that the above won't compile (as lastNameIncollection may not be assigned) forces the programmer to think about the case where the collection of names is empty.

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I think that does not answer the question. It is not why the compiler complains, but why local variables are not automatically initialized with the default value, like members of a class, and why you have to do it explicitly. –  Reboot Dec 22 '11 at 9:50
2  
@Reboot: No, I've explained why: it's to avoid you accidentally using them before they've been given a value. –  Jon Skeet Dec 22 '11 at 9:56
    
If local variables would be assigned a default value, the problem wouldn't exist in the first place. That's the question: Why are local variables not assigned a default value? So explaining why the compiler prevents you from using an unitialized value, doesn't explain why you have to initialize the variable manually. –  Reboot Dec 22 '11 at 10:14
1  
@Reboot: No, the problem would be there - the problem where you mean to only read a local variable that's been assigned a specific value, but you've ended up going through an execution path which doesn't assign that value. If you want an initial value, you can easily give one - but I'm glad that the compiler stops me from trying to read a local variable which hasn't explicitly been given a value. –  Jon Skeet Dec 22 '11 at 10:19
2  
@Reboot: I've answered that several times now: to prevent bugs. If you've got code which is meant to go through one of two routes to assign a value, but actually there's a third route which wouldn't assign a value, why would I not want to know that at compile time? The language has been design to try to avoid you making that sort of mistake. I don't know how I can be any clearer than that... –  Jon Skeet Dec 22 '11 at 10:51

Leaving the variable uninitialized is sometimes a good thing, to allow the compiler to check that it has been assigned in all possible branches of the code before using it. For example if you have a complex condition that assigns a variable and should never be null:

String variable;
if (conditionA) {
    if (conditionB)
        variable = "B";
    else
        variable = "A";
} else {
    switch (conditionC) {
    case 1:
        variable = "C1";
        break;
    case 2:
        variable = "C2";
        break;
    default:
        variable = "CD";
        break;
    }
}
System.out.println(variable.length());

If you forget to assign the variable in one of the branches, the compiler will complain. Since you know, that you never assign null, you can safely use the variable without checking it for null. If you initialize the variable with null in the definition and you forget to set the variable to a value the compiler will not be able to check this and you can get a NullPointerException:

String variable = null;
if (conditionA)
    variable = "A";
// NullPointerException if conditionA is false, not check by compiler
System.out.println(variable.length());

The variable could also be final, in which case it can only be assigned once. If you would initialize it with a default value, it would already have been assigned and can not be reassigned:

final int variable;
if (condition)
    variable = 1;
else
    variable = 2;
share|improve this answer

It can also be completely unnecessary to initialize it, if it is initialized definitely later:

    String foo;
    if (specialUseCase) {
        foo = "this";
    } else {
        foo = "that";
    }
share|improve this answer

Simple answer is:
Member local variables is not auto-initialized with 'null' value. But class member variables are.

This code will work

public class Foo {
  String foo;
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    if (foo != null) {
        System.out.println("foo");
    } else {
        System.out.println("foo2");
    }
  }
}

Or this one

public class Foo {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    String foo = null;
    if (foo != null) {
        System.out.println("foo");
    } else {
        System.out.println("foo2");
    }
  }
}

If you want to get complete deep understanding of this subject consider Jon Skeet's answer and check link he provided.

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As local variables are not initialized automatically, you have to explicitly initialize them.Only the member variables are initialized to null or the default value even if you do not explicitly initialize. If you keep String foo; outside the method main() , you do not need to initialize.

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