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I have a class (Voxel) with subclasses which may or may not have a number of different properties (material, density, etc) with get and set methods. Now, I want to write some code as follows:

template <typename VoxelType>
void process(VoxelType voxel)
{
  if(VOXEL_HAS_MATERIAL)
  {
    //Do some work which involves calling get/setMaterial()
  }
  if(VOXEL_HAS_DENSITY)
  {
    //Do some work which involves calling get/setDensity()
  }
}

I would therefore like to implement the VOXEL_HAS_MATERIAL and VOXEL_HAS_DENSITY parts. Two simple options are:

  1. Add static hasMaterial() and hasDensity() methods to the Voxel class, to be overridden in derived classes.
  2. Create a type traits class with hasMaterial() and hasDensity(), and specialize this for each Voxel subclass.

Using method (2) allows the traits to be defined for primitive types (int, etc) but this is not useful in my case. Are there any further advantages to using type traits here or should I go for the simpler static method approach?

Note: I'm also aware of SFINAE based approaches which I shall consider separately.

Edit1: I've changed the sample code to show the use of templates. I'm looking for static rather than runtime solutions to this problem. Ideally, the compiler would be able to strip out the code in the if statements if it determines they can not be executed for the given type.

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1  
"void process(Voxel voxel)" - do you mean "SomeVoxelSubclass voxel" ? –  Abyx Dec 22 '11 at 9:29
2  
What do you mean "static methods to be overridden in derived classes"? –  Luchian Grigore Dec 22 '11 at 9:30
    
Thanks for the comments - I'm actually using templates and have updated the code sample to reflect this. Didn't want to mislead I just simplified the code a bit to much ;-) –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:01
    
@Luchian Grigore - I mean I add a static method hasMaterial() to Voxel and have it return false. Then in my subclass 'VoxelWithMaterial' I override this to return true. You can override static functions, right? I know they can't be virtual but they can still be overridden? Or are my fundamentals failing me? –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:04
1  
FWIW, there's a third option: define a free function bool has_material(Voxel&) and let the authors of the subclasses overload it or ADL-overload it. If it's inlined and returns a constant, and especially if you make it constexpr in C++11, then the optimizer ought to have just as good a time of it as it does with a type trait. –  Steve Jessop Dec 22 '11 at 10:14
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Type-traits are useful because they can easily be added to types even if you cannot change the type itself. Also, using type-traits you can simply provide a sensible default (for instance, you can just delegate hasMaterial and hasDensity to appropriate static members of the class), and then you just have to specialize the trait for classes that do not work with this default.

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Ok, thanks, these are useful points. –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:08
    
Lots of good information in this thread, but this answer is the one which most directly answers my question. Accepted. –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 15:28
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Why should these methods be static? Just declare the methods as virtual bool hasMaterial(); and virtual bool hasDensity(); in the Voxel class and override them in any subclasses. Return true in the subclasses if they have them and false if not.

You could then do:

void process(Voxel* voxel)
{
    if(voxel->hasMaterial())
    {
        //Do some work which involves calling get/setMaterial()
    }
    if(voxel->hasDensity())
    {
        //Do some work which involves calling get/setDensity()
    }
}

Then, you can create an interface like class with the getters and setters of the material and density and also have them inherit that.

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This creates addition runtime-overhead compared to static members or type-traits. –  Björn Pollex Dec 22 '11 at 9:34
1  
Yes, but where does it say he wants it to be completely optimized? –  Léon Rodenburg Dec 22 '11 at 9:35
    
Thanks for the comment, but I would like a compile-time solution so that ideally the redundant if's can be removed by the compiler. Performance is important in this case. I have updated the code to demonstrate the use of templates in my code. –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:06
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Static members cannot be overrided. You should make them virtual instead. I guess that you have a problem with design please if it possible paste some uml diagram or your source code.

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I was not aware of this limitation. I know static members cannot be virtual, but I didn't know you can't override them at all. I will test and look at this further. –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:10
    
Ok, it turns out I meant 'hiding' rather than 'overriding'. A subclass is able to hide the static functions in the base class by redefining them. –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:39
    
I will suggest you to avoid hiding methods, this might generate a lot of problems in a future. I still believe that you have some kind of problem in your design. Uml diagramm or source code in this case could be useful to solve your problem. –  AlexTheo Dec 22 '11 at 11:15
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Instead of using run-time, use static check.

First, define this macro :

#define HAS_MEMBER_VARIABLE( NEW_STRUCT, VAR )                                  \
template<typename T> struct NEW_STRUCT {                                        \
    struct Fallback { int VAR; }; /* introduce member name "VAR" */             \
    struct Derived : T, Fallback { };                                           \
                                                                                \
    template<typename C, C> struct ChT;                                         \
                                                                                \
    template<typename C> static char (&f(ChT<int Fallback::*, &C::VAR>*))[1];   \
    template<typename C> static char (&f(...))[2];                              \
                                                                                \
    static bool const value = sizeof(f<Derived>(0)) == 2;                       \
};

which check whether a member variable exists in a class.

Then use SFINAE to do something if the variable exists, like in the next example :

#include <iostream>

#define HAS_MEMBER_VARIABLE( NEW_STRUCT, VAR )                                  \
template<typename T> struct NEW_STRUCT {                                        \
    struct Fallback { int VAR; }; /* introduce member name "VAR" */             \
    struct Derived : T, Fallback { };                                           \
                                                                                \
    template<typename C, C> struct ChT;                                         \
                                                                                \
    template<typename C> static char (&f(ChT<int Fallback::*, &C::VAR>*))[1];   \
    template<typename C> static char (&f(...))[2];                              \
                                                                                \
    static bool const value = sizeof(f<Derived>(0)) == 2;                       \
};

HAS_MEMBER_VARIABLE( x_check, x )

struct A
{
    int x;
};
struct B
{
    float notX;
};

template< typename T, bool hasX = x_check<T>::value >
struct doX
{
    static void foo( const T & t )
    {
        std::cout<<"type has x variable, and it's value is "<<t.x<<std::endl;
    }
};
template< typename T >
struct doX< T, false >
{
    static void foo( const T & )
    {
        std::cout<<"type has no x variable"<<std::endl;
    }
};

template< typename T >
void doFoo( const T& t )
{
    doX< T, x_check<T>::value >::foo( t );
};

int main()
{
    A a;    a.x = 6;
    B b;    b.notX = 3.6;

    std::cout<<"Calling foo() on A : ";
    doFoo( a );
    std::cout<<"Calling foo() on B : ";
    doFoo( b );
}
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It's a good answer, but I did state that I was aware of SFINAE based approaches and would consider them separately. I'll mark as useful but can't accept as the correct answer. –  PolyVox Dec 22 '11 at 10:13
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