Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm implementing some type (MyType in the example below) which has a Collection property. Inside MyType I don't really care what kind of collection this is. The only thing I care is that it implements IEnumerable<String> and INotifyCollectionChanged. How would I implement the Collection property with these restrictions?

Here is what I've tried:

I created a new interface:

interface INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T> : IEnumerable<T>, INotifyCollectionChanged {}

and made the Collection property in MyType of type INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<String>. This seems to work inside MyType. It looks like i can enumerate over that collection and register the CollectionChanged event.

But I can't set this property to a collection (MyCollection in the example below), even tough MyCollection implements both IEnumerable<String> and INotifyCollectionChanged.

The compiler says:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'InterfaceInheranceTest.Program.MyCollection' to 'InterfaceInheranceTest.Program.INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

What is the right way to do this?

Here is the full example code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

namespace InterfaceInheranceTest
{
    class Program
    {

        interface INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T> : IEnumerable<T>, INotifyCollectionChanged {}

        class MyCollection : IEnumerable<String>, INotifyCollectionChanged
        {

            IEnumerator<String> IEnumerable<String>.GetEnumerator()
            { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

            System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
            { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

            public event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged;
        }

        class MyType
        {
            private INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<String> _Collection;

            public INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<String> Collection
            {
                get { return _Collection;  }
                set
                {
                    _Collection = value;
                    _Collection.CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(_Collection_CollectionChanged);
                    foreach (var item in _Collection)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(item);
                    }
                }
            }

            void _Collection_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
            { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
        }


        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var collection = new MyCollection();
            var type = new MyType();
            type.Collection = collection;   // compiler doesn't like this!
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your class needs to implement INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T>.

    class MyCollection : INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<string>. 
                         IEnumerable<string>, INotifyCollectionChanged
    {

        IEnumerator<String> IEnumerable<String>.GetEnumerator()
        { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

        System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

        public event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged;
    }

This is needed because the variable you use(_collection) is of type INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T>. However, your class - MyCollectionChanged does not implement this interface, so can't be assigned as a reference to the variable.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok that compiles. But why is this needed? It already implements IEnumerable<String> and INotifyCollectionChanged. And INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T> does not really add anything to them. – Robert Hegner Dec 22 '11 at 10:03
    
@RobertHegner - You are defining the type of the variable you are using to be INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T>. Your implementation does not implement this interface, so can't be used as a valid reference to it. – Oded Dec 22 '11 at 10:04
    
Ok thanks for your solution and the explanation! I will accept in 4 minutes... :) – Robert Hegner Dec 22 '11 at 10:07
    
Just a small correction. In this example MyCollection is not a generic type, so we need to replace Twith String or it won't compile. – Robert Hegner Dec 22 '11 at 10:12
    
@RobertHegner - good point. Answer updated. – Oded Dec 22 '11 at 10:13

You created a new interface but you don't use it.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Collections.Specialized;

namespace InterfaceInheranceTest
{
    class Program
    {

        interface INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<T> : IEnumerable<T>, INotifyCollectionChanged {}

        class MyCollection : INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<String> // Use your interface
        {

            IEnumerator<String> IEnumerable<String>.GetEnumerator()
            { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

            System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
            { throw new NotImplementedException(); }

            public event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged;
        }

        class MyType
        {
            private INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<String> _Collection;

            public INotifyEnumerableCollectionChanged<String> Collection
            {
                get { return _Collection;  }
                set
                {
                    _Collection = value;
                    _Collection.CollectionChanged += new NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(_Collection_CollectionChanged);
                    foreach (var item in _Collection)
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(item);
                    }
                }
            }

            void _Collection_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
            { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
        }


        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var collection = new MyCollection();
            var type = new MyType();
            type.Collection = collection;   // compiler doesn't like this!
        }
    }
}

Defining same methods do not mean it's the same type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.