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I have an items table and I need to create some in distinct pairs. My schema includes an equivalent_id, which stores the ID of a partner if that partner exists.

What is the best way to set up the relationship in the model? It seems odd to say has_one or belongs_to because neither of the items in the pair are in any conceptual way dominant over the other.

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2 Answers 2

Using has_one, you could say has_one :equivalent, :class_name => "Item" and it looks readable to me.

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One-to-One self-referential and bi-directional association is (surprisingly) a bit more complex that One-to-Many or even Many-to-Many self-referential and bi-directional association.

Just to be clear:

  • self-referential: the associated item is an instance of the same class that its owner.
  • bi-directional: if an item is the equivalent of another, then the latter is also the equivalent of the first-mentioned.

That means:

revolver = Item.create name: 'revolver'
pistol   = Item.create name: 'pistol'

revolver.equivalent = pistol
revolver.equivalent # => pistol
pistol.equivalent   # => revolver

In other terms, when you set equivalent_id to an item, the owner' equivalent_id must also be set.

One-to-One association doesn't accept insert_sql and delete_sql option. So it's a bit less pretty. However, the cleanest way to do this (IMO) is:

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :equivalent, class_name: 'Item', foreign_key: 'equivalent_id'

  def add_equivalent(other)
    self.equivalent  = other
    other.equivalent = self
  end

  def remove_equivalent
    equivalent.equivalent = nil
    self.equivalent       = nil 
  end
end

This way, you can do:

revolver = Item.create name: 'revolver'
pistol   = Item.create name: 'pistol'

revolver.add_equivalent(pistol)
revolver.equivalent # => pistol
pistol.equivalent   # => revolver

pistol.remove_equivalent
pistol.equivalent   # => nil
revolver.equivalent # => nil

edit:

To be secure, you should clean up the relationship every time you add an equivalent. That means:

revolver.equivalent # => pistol
pistol.equivalent   # => revolver

revolver.add_equivalent(gun)
revolver.equivalent # => gun
pistol.equivalent   # => nil

You can do that like that:

def add_equivalent(other)
  remove_equivalent if equivalent
  ...
end
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You could override equivalent= to replace any existing equivalent. Assuming that There Can Be Only One. –  rkb Dec 22 '11 at 19:41
    
@rkb I would be so happy if it was so simple. I skipped the details in my answer but feel free to try and post. I will for sure up vote for a better answer. Transactions are capricious sometimes (especially when it comes to clearing the existing relationship before creating a new one). Once again, that's the cleanest way in my opinion to do it. –  delba Dec 22 '11 at 20:54

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