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This may seems rather argumentative, but I just went through SQLAlchemy's ORM tutorial and ended up with the following code:

from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy import Table, Column, Integer, String, MetaData, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker

engine = create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:', echo=True)

metadata = MetaData()
users_table = Table('users', metadata,
    Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True),
    Column('name', String),
    Column('fullname', String),
    Column('password', String)
)

metadata.create_all(engine)

Base = declarative_base()
class User(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'users'

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String)
    fullname = Column(String)
    password = Column(String)

    def __init__(self, name, fullname, password):
        self.name = name
        self.fullname = fullname
        self.password = password

    def __repr__(self):
       return "<User('%s','%s', '%s')>" % (self.name, self.fullname, self.password)

users_table = User.__table__
metadata = Base.metadata

Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
Session = sessionmaker()
Session.configure(bind=engine)  # once engine is available
session = Session()

# actually using the ORM isn't too bad..
ed_user = User('ed', 'Ed Jones', 'edspassword')
session.add(ed_user)

our_user = session.query(User).filter_by(name='ed').first() 
print our_user

session.add_all([
    User('wendy', 'Wendy Williams', 'foobar'),
    User('mary', 'Mary Contrary', 'xxg527'),
    User('fred', 'Fred Flinstone', 'blah')])

ed_user.password = 'f8s7ccs'

print session.dirty
print session.new
session.commit()

for instance in session.query(User).order_by(User.id): 
    print instance.name, instance.fullname

for name, fullname in session.query(User.name, User.fullname): 
    print name, fullname

This seems incredibly complicated for effectively a Hello World table, especially compared to the roughly similar SQLObject code:

from sqlobject import SQLObject, StringCol, sqlhub, connectionForURI

sqlhub.processConnection = connectionForURI('sqlite:/:memory:')

class Person(SQLObject):
    fname = StringCol()
    mi = StringCol(length=1, default=None)
    lname = StringCol()

Person.createTable()

p = Person(fname="John", lname="Doe")
p.mi = 'Q'
p2 = Person.get(1)
print p2
print p2 is p

I understand SQLAlchemy is "more powerful", but that power seems to come at a cost, or am I missing something?

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closed as not constructive by Kay, Bill the Lizard Dec 18 '12 at 14:22

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7  
Power comes at a cost? What are you saying? –  S.Lott May 13 '09 at 21:17
10  
SQLAlchemy's power comes at the cost of simplicity-of-use? –  dbr May 13 '09 at 21:21
3  
Try Elixir as mentioned below, your Hello World will be very similar to SQLObject, and you will still be able to access the SQLAlchemy layer. I used SQLObject and got frustrated by its limitations, and I'm very happy with Elixir so far (it lacks a little documentation and support, but the user base seems limited unfortunately). –  Luper Rouch May 14 '09 at 6:17
    
One does not simply append a question-mark to a statement. –  bukzor Jul 29 at 21:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 83 down vote accepted

Well, there is one thing you are missing: the tutorial you mention doesn't "build" a complete example, the different snippets of code are not meant to be concatenated into one source file. Rather, they describe the different ways the library can be used. No need to try and do the same thing over and over again yourself.

Leaving out the actually-using-the-orm part from your example, the code could look like this:

from sqlalchemy import *
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker, scoped_session

engine = create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:', echo=True)
Base = declarative_base(bind=engine)
Session = scoped_session(sessionmaker(engine))

class User(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'users'

    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String)
    fullname = Column(String)
    password = Column(String)

Base.metadata.create_all()

The "declarative" extension takes care of defining the table and mapping it to your class, so you don't need to declare the users_table yourself. The User class will also allow instantiating with keyword arguments, like User(name="foo"), (but not positional arguments though). I've also added use of scoped_session, which means you can directly use Session without actually having to instantiate it (it will instantiate a new session if there isn't already one present in the current thread, or reuse the existing one otherwise)

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2  
That looks a bit more sensible than the code I ended up with. Thanks! –  dbr May 14 '09 at 15:58
1  
I'm very hesitant about using scoped_session for much of anything; Unless you know why you need thread local storage, you should instantiate the session explicitly and pass it around as needed. –  IfLoop Oct 7 '11 at 18:59
1  
@TokenMacGuy I disagree completely. scoped_session takes all the guesswork and unnecessary argument passing out of using sessions. You just define your scoped_session class at the start, then instantiate it wherever you need access to the session, and the system does the rest. I've found it to be extremely handy for all the web apps I've written. –  CoreDumpError Dec 9 '11 at 19:46
4  
@CoreDumpError: In the case of web-apps, scoped_session may be a good fit; so long as your application needs exactly one session per request, and your using a one request per thread model. If these are not true, you may need to operate on the database outside of a request context; if you need to coordinate transactions across multiple databases, if you are doing work in an asyncronous manner to improve performance, that assumption starts to break down. –  IfLoop Dec 9 '11 at 19:57
    
Is it necessary to define engine, Base, and Session in the module scope?? That's a little gross for other modules that import this module. They don't need to know about User's internal ORM members. I'm also not quite grasping why engine and Base need to be re-instantiated inside every single Model module. –  mehaase Aug 8 '13 at 3:32

The code examples you give aren't apples-to-apples. The SQLAlchemy version could be pared down a bit:

from sqlalchemy import create_engine
from sqlalchemy import Table, Column, Integer, String, MetaData, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker

engine = create_engine('sqlite:///:memory:', echo=True)
Base = declarative_base()

class User(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'users'

    id = Column('id', Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column('name', String)
    fullname = Column('fullname', String)
    password = Column('password', String)

    def __repr__(self):
       return "" % (self.name, self.fullname, self.password)

Base.metadata.create_all(engine)

Session = sessionmaker(bind=engine)
session = Session()

# actually using the ORM isn't too bad..
ed_user = User(name='ed', fullname='Ed Jones', password='edspassword')
session.add(ed_user)

our_user = session.query(User).filter_by(name='ed').first()

session.add_all([
    User(name='wendy', fullname='Wendy Williams', password='foobar'),
    User(name='mary', fullname='Mary Contrary', password='xxg527'),
    User(name='fred', fullname='Fred Flinstone', password='blah')])

ed_user.password = 'f8s7ccs'

session.flush()

for instance in session.query(User).order_by(User.id):
    print instance.name, instance.fullname

for name, fullname in session.query(User.name, User.fullname):
    print name, fullname

You might also find Elixir more like SQLObject (but since I haven't used either, that's just a guess).

Not having used SQLObject at all, I can't comment on what exactly SA does better. But I have had great experiences with SA, especially when dealing with complicated, real-world, legacy schemas. It does a good job of coming up with good SQL queries by default, and has lots of ways to tune them.

I've found SQLAlchemy author's elevator pitch to hold up pretty well in practice.

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Having used SQLObject (and only read about SQLAlchemy), I can say that one of SQLObject's strengths is the ease and simplicity with which you can get things done. Also, excellent support is provided by the email group (https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/sqlobject-discuss) that gets answers back to you pretty quickly.

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Try Quick ORM, it is even simpler:

from quick_orm.core import Database
from sqlalchemy import Column, String

class User(object):
    __metaclass__ = Database.DefaultMeta
    name = Column(String(30))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    database = Database('sqlite://')
    database.create_tables()

    user = User(name = 'Hello World')
    database.session.add_then_commit(user)

    user = database.session.query(User).get(1)
    print 'My name is', user.name

Quick ORM is built upon SQLAlchemy, so we could say that SQLAlchemy could be as simple as SQLObject.

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I am sorry that quick_orm is not maintained any more. –  Tyler Long Mar 1 at 4:23

Well, SQLAlchemy is divided into different parts, the main core part simply handles the DB, transforming your python built queries into the appropriate SQL language for the underlying DB. Then there is the support for sessions, the orm, and the new declarative syntax.

Looks like SQLObject (I can't say for sure, haven't used it in many years, and even then, only once) skips most of it and does the ORM part straight away. This often makes things easier for simple data (which you can get away with in most cases), but SQLAlchemy allows for more complex db layouts, and get down and dirty with the db if you really need it.

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SQLObject seems to support more advanced things, like one-to-many/many-to-one/many-to-many relationships (which covers about every database layout I've seen) and transactions. –  dbr May 13 '09 at 21:45

you say "convoluted".... someone else might say "flexible". Sometimes you need it sometimes you don't. Isn't it awesome that you have a choice?

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, but I say "convoluted" because it seems to force you to use a lot of it's features to do basic stuff. Flexibility is great, but not if it involves five lines of import's just to get started! –  dbr May 13 '09 at 21:33

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