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We all know doing something like this is bad:

<ul>
  <li>Item</li>
  <li>Item</li>
  ... 500 more list items
</ul>

and then...

$("ul li").bind("click", function() { ... });

I've been looking through a lot of Backbone examples / guides and the following seems to be a standard approach to rendering a list with items, based from a collection of models.

var ListView = Backbone.View.extend() {

  tagName: 'ul',

  render: function() {
    this.collection.each(function(item) {
      var view = new ListItemView({model: item});
      $(this.el).append(view.render().el);
    });
    return this;
  }
});

A list item view:

var ListItemView = Backbone.View.extend() {

  tagName: 'li',

  events: {
   'click' : 'log'
  }

  log : function() {
    console.log(this.model.get("title"));
  }

  render: function() {
    $(this.el).html(this.template(this.model.toJSON()));
    return this;
  }
});

If I'm not mistaken, instantiating the listView with a collection with 500 models, gives me 500 click events, one for each row. This is bad right?

I know Backbone has built in event delegation for namespaced events:

events : {
  'click li' : 'log'
}

I suppose I could put this in my ListView, and it would only create one click event for the entire list, but then I wouldn't be able access to model data corresponding to the clicked list item.

What patterns do backbone developers use to solve this typical problem?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Derick Bailey wrote a detailed blog post about this dilemma, you can check it out here: http://lostechies.com/derickbailey/2011/10/11/backbone-js-getting-the-model-for-a-clicked-element/

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Thanks, that was the kind of discussion I was looking for. –  Daniel Dec 22 '11 at 12:35

Keep track of the subviews from the parent view. Then when adding the subview add it to the hash as well as add the cid to the el of the subview. This way have a pointer to the subview and could perform operations on its model etc...

I have not tested this exact code below so THIS may be wrong in a place or two but I have tested this general principle. I have also omitted the listitemview code.

var ListView = Backbone.View.extend() {
  subViews: {},
  tagName: 'ul',
  events: {
    'click li' : 'clickItem'
  },
  clickItem: function(event){
     var id = event.currentTarget.cid;
     var subView = this.subViews[id];


  },
  render: function() {

    this.collection.each(function(item) {
      var view = new ListItemView({model: item});
      this.subViews[view.cid] = view;
      subEl = view.render().el;
      subEl.cid = view.cid;
      $(this.el).append(subEl);
    });
    return this;
  }
});
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You can associate the instance with an element like so:

events : {
  'click li' : 'log'
},

log: function( e ) {
var elm = e.currentTarget //Same as `this` in normally bound jQuery event


jQuery.data( elm, "viewInstance" ).log( e );
},

Then:

var ListItemView = Backbone.View.extend() {

  tagName: 'li',

  log : function() {
    console.log(this.model.get("title");
  }

  render: function() {
        //Associate the element with the instance
    $(this.el).html(this.template(this.model.toJSON())).data( "viewInstance", this );
    return this;
  }
});
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1  
Thanks for your reply. This is kind of what I've had to do to work around this problem up to now, but then again, It's using jQuery to store data in the DOM, doesn't feel like a very clean approach in the long run. –  Daniel Dec 22 '11 at 12:22
1  
@Daniel Well jQuery doesn't store the data in the DOM, it stores it in a regular js object (jQuery.cache). jQuery also internally pollutes any element that has event(s) with an expando property anyway, after which doing data on the element has no effect other than adding more properties in the regular js object. –  Esailija Dec 22 '11 at 12:24
    
Ah Ok. well I guess that would sort of work then. thanks –  Daniel Dec 22 '11 at 12:28
    
@Daniel yes, binding events to every single element doesn't make any sense, it's the same as using jQuery.data on each of those elements + binding a native event to each one of them. You could avoid this by not using jQuery at all to bind events but is it really any better than using DOM data. :P –  Esailija Dec 22 '11 at 12:46

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