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I want to create a warning dialog box which asks the users if the information typed during signup was correct, and asks him wether he want to continue or close that dialog and correct his information.

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Even Task Dialog in new Windows versions doesn't have the common buttons with this caption. Talking about task dialog you might use the custom buttons (see the screenshot from the link). In standard MessageBox there's IMHO no way how to change the button captions. So the easiest way is to create your own one, but maybe I'm wrong... Maybe this way ? –  TLama Dec 22 '11 at 12:29
1  
@TLama Task dialog lets you give the buttons any name you fancy –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '11 at 12:31
    
@David, I was talking about dwCommonButtons, those you can't change or am I wrong ? –  TLama Dec 22 '11 at 12:34
    
@tlama that's not really the point since one of the goals of task dialog is to allow buttons with any caption –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '11 at 12:37
3  
Continue and Close mean pretty much the same thing. You need better names. Read the windows ux guidelines. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '11 at 13:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
var
  td: TTaskDialog;
  tb: TTaskDialogBaseButtonItem;
begin
  td := TTaskDialog.Create(nil);
  try
    td.Caption := 'Warning';
    td.Text := 'Continue or Close?';
    td.MainIcon := tdiWarning;
    td.CommonButtons := [];

    tb := td.Buttons.Add;
    tb.Caption := 'Continue';
    tb.ModalResult := 100;

    tb := td.Buttons.Add;
    tb.Caption := 'Close';
    tb.ModalResult := 101;

    td.Execute;

    if td.ModalResult = 100 then
      ShowMessage('Continue')
    else if td.ModalResult = 101 then
      ShowMessage('Close');

  finally
    td.Free;
  end;
end;

enter image description here

Note: This will only work on Windows Vista or later.

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2  
+1 for complete answer, (although close is a very bad caption for a button because of its general ambiguity and meaninglessness :-) –  Johan Dec 22 '11 at 13:32
1  
@DavidHeffernan - Yes, will not work in XP. –  Mikael Eriksson Dec 22 '11 at 13:35
1  
.. and only when themes are enabled. I remember David has made a note on this somehere.. update - here –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 22 '11 at 13:49
3  
Close generally means close the dialog and is used when there are no options. Continue and Cancel are most often paired. –  Marcus Adams Dec 22 '11 at 14:56
1  
@sertac The QC report is here: qc.embarcadero.com/wc/qcmain.aspx?d=89798 –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '11 at 19:14
var
  AMsgDialog: TForm;
  abutton: TButton;
  bbutton: TButton;
begin

  AMsgDialog := CreateMessageDialog('This is a test message.', mtWarning,[]);
  abutton := TButton.Create(AMsgDialog);
  bbutton :=  TButton.Create(AMsgDialog);

  with AMsgDialog do

    try

      Caption := 'Dialog Title' ;
      Height := 140;
      AMsgDialog.Width := 260 ;

      with abutton do
      begin
        Parent := AMsgDialog;
        Caption := 'Continue';
        Top := 67;
        Left := 60;
        // OnClick :tnotyfievent ;
      end;

      with bbutton do
      begin
        Parent := AMsgDialog;
        Caption := 'Close';
        Top := 67;
        Left := 140;
        //OnClick :tnotyfievent ;
      end;

       ShowModal ;

    finally
      abutton.Free;
      bbutton.Free;
      Free;
    end;

enter image description here

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if delphi then

if mrYes=MessageDlg('Continue?',mtwarning,[mbYes, mbNo],0) then 
  begin
        //do somthing
  end
else
exit; //go out
share|improve this answer
    
what about writing ( Continue and Close ) instead of ( Yes and No ) ? –  Rafik Bari Dec 22 '11 at 12:28
2  
you can only have this for the messageDlg mbYes, mbNo, mbOK,mbCancel,mbAbort, mbRetry, mbIgnore, mbAll, mbNoToAll, mbYesToAll, mbHelp –  PresleyDias Dec 22 '11 at 12:31
    
You can, I've tested it now ... –  TLama Dec 22 '11 at 13:00
1  
@chris the standard changed ages ago when Vista came out. Read about task dialog. –  David Heffernan Dec 22 '11 at 13:28
1  
Ages ago.. yes.. Still not available to the majority of windows users, particularly enterprise users. I do like the task dialog, but it's overkill for such a simple confirmation prompt, unless those Continue/Close captions are necessary/justified, which I suspect they aren't. –  Chris Thornton Dec 22 '11 at 14:21

Based on this:

procedure HookResourceString(rs: PResStringRec; newStr: PChar);
var
  oldprotect: DWORD;
begin
  VirtualProtect(rs, SizeOf(rs^), PAGE_EXECUTE_READWRITE, @oldProtect);
  rs^.Identifier := Integer(newStr);
  VirtualProtect(rs, SizeOf(rs^), oldProtect, @oldProtect);
end;

const
  SContinue = 'Continue';
  SClose = 'Close';

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  HookResourceString(@SMsgDlgOK, SContinue);
  HookResourceString(@SMsgDlgCancel, SClose);
  if MessageDlg('My Message', mtConfirmation, [mbOK, mbCancel], 0) = mrOK then
  begin
    // OK...
  end;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1, you can also use the hook to get the handle to the message box and then use GetDlgItem to get the handle of the button you want to change and set its text by using SetDlgItemText; quite overkill, I know :) But the worst on this solution is that you have to use the DLL library for that hook. –  TLama Dec 22 '11 at 13:05
    
2  
@TLama - No need for a dll, the dialog window is in the same thread. Can also hook the dialog without using SetWindowHookEx, in a message handler, such as WM_ENABLE, WM_ACTIVATE, or in ActiveFormChange etc.. –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 22 '11 at 13:30
2  
The problem with this solution is that you're not restoring the original Identifier values afterwards, so every dialog displayed after this will show Continue instead of OK and Close instead of Cancel. There are other, better alternatives to this solution; they've even been posted here in this thread. (Not downvoting, just pointing out the problem.) –  Ken White Dec 22 '11 at 15:02
1  
@TLama - Sorry for the confusion, it's my incorrect wording. I should possibly say 'hack' the dialog, instead of 'hook' the dialog. In a WM_ACTIVATE handler that's calling the dialog, you can loop forms when active is WA_INACTIVE, see if the activating form is a 'TMessageForm' (in case of a TaskDialog get the activating windows class name to compare...), etc.. –  Sertac Akyuz Dec 22 '11 at 15:11

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