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Perldata gives the following example.

$field = $query->radio_group(
  name => 'group_name',
  values => ['eenie','meenie','minie'],
  default => 'meenie',
  linebreak => 'true',
  labels => \%labels
);

My understanding for this example is that , “radio-group” is used as a key for hash “query”. This key, “radio-group” , itself is a hashref, including name=’group_name’,etc. Moreover, this hashref, identified by “radio_group” is assigned to $field. If my understanding is wrong, please correct me.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

$query->radio_group is a method call.

In this particular example the method is being called on the object instance $query with the hash containing the given key-value pairs.

It's the same as if the following had been written:

my %tmp = (
    name => 'group_name',
    values => ['eenie','meenie','minie'],
    default => 'meenie',
    linebreak => 'true',
    labels => \%labels
);

$field = $query->radio_group(%tmp);

which should make it clear that the hashed set of parameters is independent of $query itself.

The result of that method call is then assigned to $field.

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This is a call on the method "radio_group" from the object $query. There are no hashes there, just a bunch of parameter pairs separated by commas and fat commas (=>). From perlop:

The => operator is a synonym for the comma except that it causes its left operand to be interpreted as a string if it begins with a letter or underscore and is composed only of letters, digits and underscores. This includes operands that might otherwise be interpreted as operators, constants, single number v-strings or function calls. If in doubt about this behavior, the left operand can be quoted explicitly. Otherwise, the => operator behaves exactly as the comma operator or list argument separator, according to context.

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This is equivalent to writing:

my %params = (
  name => 'group_name',
  values => ['eenie','meenie','minie'],
  default => 'meenie',
  linebreak => 'true',
  labels => \%labels
);

$field = radio_group( $query, %params );

So radio_group is not a hash key at all, but a subroutine/method/function.

The tell-tale signs are:

  • The absence of [] and {}, used to denote array indices and hash keys
  • The presence of () parens after radio_group
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1  
"The hash here" is not correct, as there are NO hashes in the code (apart from %labels)... –  tadmc Dec 22 '11 at 14:04
    
@tadmc : It's so easy to forget about lists :| –  Zaid Dec 22 '11 at 14:35
    
Yes, and list confusion is exactly what led this poster off into the woods. He saw a "hash shaped list" and started thinking "hash" when there was no hash there. :-) –  tadmc Dec 22 '11 at 15:59
    
That code is not equivalent. It assumes radio_group exists in the current namespace and it skips method dispatch. –  friedo Dec 22 '11 at 16:05

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