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I am trying to show CPU and memory load in the statusbar of a MDI Form. The cpu and memory status are working correct if I just call them with a method. But now I want to make a Timer which continues updating two labels as long as the application is running:

public System.Threading.Timer MainTimer;
public System.Threading.TimerCallback MainTimerCallback;

private void InitializeTimer()
{
    MainTimerCallback = new System.Threading.TimerCallback(MainTimer_Tick);
    MainTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(MainTimerCallback,this,0,100);
}

private void MainTimer_Tick(object obj)
{
    UpdateSystemDiagnostics();
}

Then I code this in my MDI form constructor:

public MainForm()
{
    InitializeComponent();

    InitializeSystemDiagnostics();
    InitializeTimer();
}

This is for code for my diagnostics:

private PerformanceCounter _cpuLoad;
private PerformanceCounter _ramFree;
public float[] SystemDiagnostic = new float[2] { 0, 0 };

private void InitializeSystemDiagnostics()
{
    //Diagnostics
    _cpuLoad = new PerformanceCounter { CategoryName = "Processor", CounterName = "% Processor Time", InstanceName = "_Total" };
    _ramFree = new PerformanceCounter("Memory", "Available MBytes");
}

private void UpdateSystemDiagnostics()
{
    SystemDiagnostic[0] = _cpuLoad.NextValue();
    SystemDiagnostic[1] = _ramFree.NextValue();

    _labelCpuStatus.Text = string.Format("CPU LOAD: ") + string.Format("{0:0.##}%", SystemDiagnostic[0]).PadRight(8);
    _labelMemoryStatus.Text = string.Format("FREE MEMORY: {0}MB", SystemDiagnostic[1]);
}

Why this cause the form to close as soon as I open it? Even if I hit debug it just opens and closes right away!

Also my other question is: Does this timer run on another thread? If I pass a time consuming operation to its Tick event, will it cause the UI to freeze or stutter?

UPDATE

When I put a breakpoint on this line:

_labelCpuStatus.Text = string.Format("CPU LOAD: ") + string.Format("{0:0.##}%", SystemDiagnostic[0]).PadRight(8);

I noticed that it works for like 2 or 3 times and it updates the label, but it quits with no warning or exception!

share|improve this question
    
How are you running the form? i.e. Program.cs and Main(...)? –  Samuel Slade Dec 22 '11 at 13:30
    
Just like a normal winform...yeah it runs through Program.cs –  Saeid Yazdani Dec 22 '11 at 13:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the form simply opens and closes immediately, it is likely you have an unhandled exception inside your constructor code. WinForms has an annoying habit of swallowing exceptions like this. If you Google around about it you should find some more information on it. You may be able to view the contents of this exception (if I am right in thinking that's the cause) by going to Debug > Exceptions and checking the box next to Common Language Runtime Exceptions under Thrown. This should break on all exceptions under that category.

As for whether the timer runs on another thread or not, best way to check is to add Thread.Sleep(...some large number...) in your handler for the Tick event (when your form is running) and see if it freezes the form. If so, it is running on the same thread.

EDIT

I've just had a quick look on MSDN and this is what I found about the threading of the timers:

System.Windows.Forms.Timer:

A Timer is used to raise an event at user-defined intervals. This Windows timer is designed for a single-threaded environment where UI threads are used to perform processing. It requires that the user code have a UI message pump available and always operate from the same thread, or marshal the call onto another thread.

System.Threading.Thread.Timer

Use a TimerCallback delegate to specify the method you want the Timer to execute. The timer delegate is specified when the timer is constructed, and cannot be changed. The method does not execute on the thread that created the timer; it executes on a ThreadPool thread supplied by the system.

So if I am correct in my understanding; the System.Windows.Forms.Timer executes on the UI thread (so will freeze the UI if performing long operations on it) and the System.Threading.Thread.Timer executes on a different thread to the UI (so shouldn't freeze the UI if performing long operations on it).

Note: Just to clarify; I am not saying that the UI should be updated on another thread - instead, I am merely trying to illustrate the differences between the timers that had been noted. UI can only be updated on the UI thread. If long operations need to be performed without freezing the UI thread (that are independent of any UI elements), they can be performed on a separate thread and then the update of the UI can be invoked on the UI thread.

share|improve this answer
    
Your last point is correct, but the OP specifically talks about updating the UI. You'd want to do that from the UI thread. –  codesparkle Dec 22 '11 at 13:44
    
Yes, you do. I was merely trying to illustrate the differences with the timers. You can, however, execute long operations (that are independent of any UI elements) on a separate thread, and call back to the UI thread to update the UI. –  Samuel Slade Dec 22 '11 at 13:47
    
It's not possible to update the UI NOT from the UI thread :) –  Elastep Dec 22 '11 at 13:47
    
@Elastep See my comment. –  Samuel Slade Dec 22 '11 at 13:47
1  
good clarification + suggesting a robust approach. –  codesparkle Dec 22 '11 at 13:53

Use System.Windows.Forms.Timer instead of System.Threading.Timer System.Threading.Timer runs it's fired event in another thread. But you can't change UI from another thread as you'll get cross thread operation exception.

share|improve this answer
    
But I heard that one uses the UI thread and causes the UI to be unresponsive. Am I wrong? –  Saeid Yazdani Dec 22 '11 at 13:31
    
There's no other way of changing UI. Only from the UI thread. The only thing you SHOULD NOT NEVER DO is to make long calculations in the ui thread. Label text updates is ok and is the exact thing that is needed to be done in the UI thread –  Elastep Dec 22 '11 at 13:34
1  
here's a comparison: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164015.aspx –  codesparkle Dec 22 '11 at 13:37
    
@Sean87 The Forms.Timer will not cause the UI to be unresponsive between ticks. When it ticks and the method for that is called – it will. If that method is quick, though, there shouldn't be a problem. But best is – try a simple program with a Forms.Timer. –  ispiro Dec 22 '11 at 16:38

if you want minimum changes you can add this to your code:

private void UpdateSystemDiagnostics()
{
    SystemDiagnostic[0] = _cpuLoad.NextValue();
    SystemDiagnostic[1] = _ramFree.NextValue();
 this.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(delegate
            {
                _labelCpuStatus.Text = string.Format("CPU LOAD: ") + string.Format("{0:0.##}%", SystemDiagnostic[0]).PadRight(8);
    _labelMemoryStatus.Text = string.Format("FREE MEMORY: {0}MB", SystemDiagnostic[1]);
            }));

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks this added to my knowledge ! –  Saeid Yazdani Dec 22 '11 at 13:53

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