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I have a function that is given two integers and returns a string. Right now I have this:

char* myfunc( int a, int b, int* len )
{
    int retLen = ...
    char* ret = malloc( retLen + 1 );

    if ( len != NULL )
    {
        *len = retLen;
    }

    return ret;
}

However, most functions in the C library tend to do something more like:

int myfunc( char* ret, int a, int b )
{
    ...

    return retLen;
}

You are then expected to allocate the memory for the function to fill. This allows you to do a bit more like choose where the string is allocated.

In this case though there is some maths required in the function to get the length, and there is no reason to have a buffer of any size other than the one needed. There is no upper limit on the size of the buffer (not one that is reasonable anyway).

What is considered good practice when returning a string whose length is dynamically found given the inputs?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A pattern I saw in kernel-mode programs is:

  1. You call the function once, with some allocated memory if you happen to have some available, or null as param if you happen to have none
  2. If you had memory allocated and the function found it enough it puts the result in that memory and returns OK
  3. If you had no memory to pass in, or the memory passed was too little, the function returns ERROR_NOT_ENOUGH_MEMORY, and puts in an output parameter the needed memory.
    • You then allocate this needed memory and call the function again

Sample:

int myfunc(
    __out char*  output, 
    __in  size_t given, 
    __out size_t needed_or_resulted, 
    extra params ...
){
    ... implementation
}

The needed_or_resulted can be also used to transmit how much of the given memory was used in case of success.

To be used like:

int result = myfunc(output, given, needed_or_resulted, extra params ...);
if(result == OK) {
    // all ok, do what you need done with result of size "needed_or_resulted" on "output"
} else if(result == ERROR_NOT_ENOUGH_MEMORY) {
    output = malloc(needed ...
    result = myfunc(output, given, needed_or_resulted, extra params ...);
    if(result == OK) {
        // all ok, do what you need done with result of size "needed_or_resulted" on "output"
    } else if(result == ERROR_OTHER) {
        // handle other possible errors
    } else {
        // handle unknown error
    }
} else if(result == ERROR_OTHER) {
    // handle other possible errors
} else {
    // handle unknown error
}
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Of course, with this pattern, you'd pass the length along with the pointer. It might even be an input/output param (passed as a size_t *). –  cHao Dec 22 '11 at 13:47
    
Yes indeed, I edited the signature. –  clyfe Dec 22 '11 at 13:51
    
Very good answer which helps a lot, so thank you. Couple of questions though: Why is this preferred to a function like size_t myfunc( char* output, size_t given, ... ) which effectively returns needed_or_resulted for the user to compare to get their own meaning for success? Also, why is this preferred to a second function like myfuncLength that does the necessary length calculations? –  Matt Dec 22 '11 at 16:59
    
size_t myfunc( char* output, size_t given, ... ) would not have an error output (success/failure) unless you make another output parameter, in which case the two are pretty much equivalent. It would also be preferred to myfuncLength because on the first call, if memory given is plentiful the computation is finished in 1 step in this optimistic case, as opposed to myfuncLength that would always run and then the real computation, 2 steps no matter what memory you have available a priori. –  clyfe Dec 22 '11 at 18:35
    
@clyfe, Ok, that explains a lot. Of course if I know that the returned length will never be zero then that could be used to indicate an error. But that would mean inconsistent signatures with functions where empty output is possible. In any event I think this is the right way to do it for a number of reasons. –  Matt Dec 22 '11 at 19:05
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The latter is better because it clues in the caller about who is responsible for freeing the memory. The former causes big problems if the caller and callee use different malloc implementations (e.g. on Windows, debug and release often use incompatible memory models).

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You are correct about the reason why the int myfunc( char* ret, int a, int b ) signature is preferred. It actually explains another thing - why the length needs to be returned (the buffer is sized at the MAX, so we usually need to inform the caller of how much of that did we actually use).

When you allocate strings inside a function, you do not usually return the size of the string, because strlen can be used to find that out. Look at strdup for an example of a function that allocates strings dynamically. So I would change the signature of your function to

char* myfunc( int a, int b) {
    ...
}
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If i'm reading the question right, there is no MAX. Or if there is one, it's too large to be creating buffers with. –  cHao Dec 22 '11 at 13:51
    
@cHao Correct, this is the imaginary MAX that the OP says he does not want to introduce. In the first part of the answer I'm explaining why we need to return length when there is a MAX, not suggesting that the OP should have one. The second part deals more with the situation at hand. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 22 '11 at 13:54
    
Also, this kinda turns the rule about freeing what you malloc on its ear. You'd better be crystal clear about who owns the memory in the documentation for this function. –  cHao Dec 22 '11 at 13:55
    
@cHao right, that's why I brought the strdup analogy. The doc for the function explicitly says that "The pointer may subsequently be used as an argument to the function free". Ownership is always an issue in systems without automated memory management. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 22 '11 at 13:59
    
This is similar to what I have now, but as an assembly programmer, it feels very wrong to let people call strlen (which I know is basically strchr for '\0') when the length is known, hence the int* len which optionally allows you to get the return length. –  Matt Dec 22 '11 at 16:54
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Follow the interface of snprintf, a standard function with exactly the same issue:

size_t myfunc(char *s, size_t n, int a, int b);

output bytes beyond the n-1st shall be discarded instead of being written to the array, and a null byte is written at the end of the bytes actually written into the array.

Upon successful completion, the snprintf() function shall return the number of bytes that would be written to s had n been sufficiently large excluding the terminating null > byte.

If the value of n is zero on a call to snprintf(), nothing shall be written, the number of bytes that would have been written had n been sufficiently large excluding the terminating null shall be returned, and s may be a null pointer.

Typical usage:

size_t needed = myfunc(0, 0, a, b) + 1;
char *buf = malloc(needed);
if (buf) {
    myfunc(buf, needed, a, b);
}

You could include the nul byte in the count returned - it makes the calling code simpler, albeit slightly less familiar to people used to standard snprintf.

If computing retLen is astonishingly expensive, there might be an argument for a function that computes it as it generates the string, and returns an allocated buffer of the right size (perhaps having realloced along the way). But I wouldn't normally even think about it. For convenience of users who want to allocate, just put the above code in a function myfunc_alloc and never mind that it duplicates a bit of work. Users who already have a buffer can call myfunc directly like so:

if (myfunc(buf, bufsize, a, b) >= bufsize) {
    printf("buffer too small, string (%s) has been truncated\n", buf);
}
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I would pass a char * by reference. If the function runs successfully, allocate the string and assign it to the pointer reference and return the length of the string. If an error is encounter, set errno and return -1.

int myfunc( int a, int b, char ** str)
{
    int retLen;

    /* code to calculate string length required */

    if (!(str))
    {
       errno = EINVAL;
       return(-1);
    };
    if (!(*str = malloc(retLen)))
       return(-1);

    /* calculate new value and store to string */

    return(retLen);
}
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