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I need to represent certain data in following format using xml.

root-> col1-item1 -> col2-item1 -> col3-item1
                                -> col3-item2
                                -> col3-item3                               
                  -> col2-item2 -> col3-item1
                                -> col3-item2                               
    -> col1-item2 -> col2-item1 -> col3-item1

I have seen couple of posts regarding such implementation but still I am confused about the best way to implement this. Which one of the following way should used to represent this data? Is there any other better approach to this?

1st Approach:

<column1items>
    <col1-item text="col1-1st item">
        <col2-item>  col2 - 1
            <col3-item> col3 - 1</col3-item>
            <col3-item> col3 - 2</col3-item>
            <col3-item> col3 - 3</col3-item>
            <col3-item> col3 - 4</col3-item>
        </col2-item>
    </col1-item>
</column1items>

2nd Approach:

<column1items>
    <col1-item>
        <text> col1-1st item </text>
        <col2-items>
            <col2-item>
                <text> col2 - 1 </text>
                <col3-items>
                    <col3-item> <text> col3 - 1 </text> </col3-item>
                    <col3-item> <text> col3 - 2 </text> </col3-item>
                    <col3-item> <text> col3 - 3 </text> </col3-item>
                    <col3-item> <text> col3 - 4 </text> </col3-item>
                </col3-items> 
            </col2-item>
        </col2-items>
    </col1-item>
</column1items>
share|improve this question
1  
The question here is: can the text have properties (formatting (bold, italics, fancy fonts)? –  Benoit Dec 22 '11 at 13:50
    
@Benoit no. it's just a plain text. Also the solution should be easily readable. –  Nilesh Dec 22 '11 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The column number of a given node can be inferred by how deeply it's nested.

<report>
  <col text="col1-item1">
    <col text="col2-item1">
      <col text="col3-item1"/>
      <col text="col3-item2"/>
      <col text="col3-item3"/>
    </col>
    <col text="col2-item2">
      <col text="col3-item1"/>
      <col text="col3-item2"/>
    </col>
  </col>
  <col text="col1-item2">
    <col text="col2-item1">
      <col text="col3-item1"/>
    </col>
  </col>
</report>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Should I use attribute or element in this case? I have read at several posts that element should be preferred when readability is of greater importance. Also do you think specifying text as value of the element would be good idea? –  Nilesh Dec 22 '11 at 16:35
    
As @Benoit hinted at, a determining factor for when NOT to use an attribute is whether you plan to nest anything else in it. Your best naming may depend on how you might reuse the format, and who or what will actually be reading the XML. Your underlying structure is a tree, so you might be happy using something more akin to <node label="xx">. Elements give more flexibility in ordering and nesting; attributes take up less space and are more obviously associated with an element. –  phatfingers Dec 22 '11 at 17:32
    
One afterthought... if your element hierarchy is fixed and already has an associated vocabulary with which your users are familiar, you should consider keeping the same structure, but changing the element names at each depth. For example, a department store that organizes products into Department, Category, and Line might use that same structure. So, <dept label="bedding"><category label="sheets"><line label="Utica"/></category></dept>, might be a simpler naming if anyone is merging documents or making manual changes. –  phatfingers Dec 24 '11 at 16:43
    
Thanks phatfingers. This will also improve readability. Will check this as well. –  Nilesh Dec 26 '11 at 6:52

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