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In this chunk of code I add a pair on a map and everything is fine but when I delete a pair that isn't the last one the map doesn't add any more pairs. What I'm Doing wrong??

SomeClass::add(Object object)
if (!object.empty())
{
    ObjectList::iterator result = find(object.name());
    if (result == ObjectList.end())
    {
        object.order(size() + 1);
        ObjectList.insert(orderedObject(object.order(), object));
    }
    else
    {
        ObjectList[result->first] = object;
    }
}

ObjectList and orderedObject are declared as follows:

typedef std::pair<int, Object> orderedObject;
typedef std::map<int, Object> ObjectList;

This is the deletion code:

SomeClass::eraseNamed(std::string aName)
{
    if (!isEmpty())
    {
        ObjectList::iterator result;
        result = find(aName);
        if (result != ObjectList.end())
        {
            ObjectList.erase(result);
            reorgObjectList();
            return true;
        }

    }
    return false;
}

For find method:

ObjectList::iterator SomeClass::find(std::string aName)
{
    ObjectList::iterator result = ObjectList.begin();
    while (result != ObjectList.end())
    {
        if (aName == result->second.name())
            return result;
        result++;
    }
    return result;
}

and for reorgObjectList:

bool SomeClass::reorgObjectList()
{
    ObjectList::iterator i=ObjectList.begin();
    int j=1;
    for (i = ObjectList.begin(); i != ObjectList.end(); ++i)
    {
        if(j!=i->second.order())
            i->second.order(j);
        j++;
    }
    return true;
}

Any suggestions???

share|improve this question
2  
How are you doing the delete? – Alex B May 13 '09 at 21:29
1  
where is object declared? – jalf May 13 '09 at 21:32
    
You ought to post more code... as jalf suggests, where is object declared? It seems as though there could be other issues here, and we may be able to offer you suggestions on usage, style, and design. I use maps all the time... it seems that I never use them like this though. – Tom May 13 '09 at 22:16

Well you are keying on the size of the map, this seems like it may cause your problems.

So if you have 3 things in the map you will have

  1 => Obj1
  2 => Obj2
  3 => Obj3

if you remove one of these elements, say at 1, you will have

  2 => Obj2
  3 => Obj3

then later you go to insert, and set the key to "size() + 1", size will return 2, and you will try to insert at key 2 + 1 == 3. 3 is already taken. So it will either get overriden or fail (not sure how your find is working above).

Instead of inserting at the size + 1, I would check the last key and increment by 1 if thats how you want to manage the key.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 however, when you use insert(...) on a key that already exists, it's not overridden. The return value indicates whether the new value was inserted or not. – Steve Folly May 13 '09 at 22:18
    
depends if [] or insert(...) is used... which depends on the result of that funky find() call (s)hes got up there. – Doug T. May 13 '09 at 22:30
    
That is true, to deal with this I reorganize the list after deleting a object.Maybe that is the root of all evil or is in deletion but I cant find the error – Oscar De Leon May 14 '09 at 15:16

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