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I am trying to render some data from a large XML using XSLT. The XML data is actually kind of graph data and not hierarchical. and elements are related to each other and as such may end up havin a circular reference (the relation types are different however).

I am trying to traverse through the relationships from one element and visiting each related element and so on. In this way, at times I reach one element that I have already traversed. In such a case, I should stop traversing further as otherwise I shall be running in a cycle.

My problem is that I am not able to store the list of elements that I have already traversed and make a look up everytime I start traversing an element, so that I can stop traversing if the element is in the lookup.

Simply said, I wanted to keep the elements in a lookup table and add each element to it as I traverse.

Is there some solution for this?

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1  
Can you be more specific on how your input looks? Why can't you store the elements you have traversed in a parameter, as done in lists.xml.org/archives/xml-dev/201110/msg00030.html? –  Martin Honnen Dec 22 '11 at 14:22
1  
XSLT is a declarative language, not a procedural one. There is therefore no notion of "earlier", or "already", or other time-related concepts. You need to rethink the process in functional terms. –  Michael Kay Dec 22 '11 at 18:03
    
A sample input, the desired output, and an attempt at a stylesheet, would all make it easier to show you a solution that applies to your situation. –  LarsH Dec 22 '11 at 20:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A recursive template can pass itself parameters that hold a node set of "previously" processed nodes and a queue of nodes to be processed. This is a functional programming equivalent of modifying state variables.

Sample input:

<graph startNode="a">
    <graphNode id="a">
        <edge target="b" />
        <edge target="c" />
    </graphNode>
    <graphNode id="b">
        <edge target="c" />
    </graphNode>
    <graphNode id="c">
        <edge target="d" />
    </graphNode>
    <graphNode id="d">
        <edge target="a" />
        <edge target="b" />
    </graphNode>
</graph>

XSL 2.0 stylesheet:

<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    version="2.0">

    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:key name="graphNodeByID" match="graphNode" use="@id" />

    <xsl:template match="/graph">
        <results>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="key('graphNodeByID', @startNode)"
                     mode="process"/>            
        </results>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="graphNode" mode="process">
        <xsl:param name="already-processed" select="/.." />
        <xsl:param name="queue" select="/.." />

        <!-- do stuff with context node ... -->
        <processing node="{@id}" />

        <!-- Add connected nodes to queue, excluding those already processed. -->
        <xsl:variable name="new-queue"
              select="($queue | key('graphNodeByID', edge/@target))
                        except ($already-processed | .)" />

        <!-- recur on next node in queue. -->
        <xsl:apply-templates select="$new-queue[1]" mode="process">
            <xsl:with-param name="already-processed"
                            select="$already-processed | ." />
            <xsl:with-param name="queue" select="$new-queue" />
        </xsl:apply-templates>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Output (tested):

<results>
   <processing node="a"/>
   <processing node="b"/>
   <processing node="c"/>
   <processing node="d"/>
</results>

As specified, no node is processed twice, even though the graph contains cycles.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a good solution. In the meantime I independently added a similar XSLT 1.0 solution to my answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 22 '11 at 21:28
    
@Dmitre: I had looked at the solution you referenced in the list archive. I found it hard to follow (mainly it was the screen formatting, and the challenge of separating the part that applied to this question from the other context), so I decided to write an implementation - it's a problem I've solved before as well. Glad you posted a separate solution here. –  LarsH Dec 22 '11 at 22:05
2  
Lars, I found a small problem both in your and in my solution and corrected this in my answer. To repro, just add this graph node to your XML: ` <graphNode id="e"> <edge target="a" /> </graphNode> ` and then run the transformation. As you'll see, the node e isn't traversed and included in the output. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 22 '11 at 23:05
    
@Dimitre: if the start node is a, then I would think e should not be traversed... why should it be? Only nodes that are reached by edges (which in my graph are directed) from the start node are traversed. If we wanted to traverse every node, we could just iterate over the set of all nodes, disregarding connectedness, and this would be a much simpler problem. If we wanted to treat the edges as undirected (bidirectional), we'd need to expand our selection for enlarging the queue (vnewNodes), as you did. –  LarsH Dec 23 '11 at 20:46
    
My understanding is that the OP needs the whole graph to be traversed, regardless from the "starting node" and that any vertex belonging to the graph qualifies as a "starting node". In the general case we cannot simply select all nodes, because the nodes may be representing several independent graphs. Your original solution is to find all nodes, that are reachable from the starting node and this isn't the same as determining all nodes in the graph. Certainly, only the OP could clarify what he wanted, however the two tasks are both useful and both should be named precisely. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 23 '11 at 21:51

This isn't difficult to do in XSLT 1.0, see my 2004 answer to a more specific graph-traversal problem:

http://lists.xml.org/archives/xml-dev/200401/msg00444.html

Here is a complete XSLT 1.0 directed graph-traversal solution, assuming a particular XML representation for the directed links (as you forgot to show to us the source XML document ...):

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kNodeById" match="*" use="@id"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:call-template name="gTraverse">
   <xsl:with-param name="pNode" select="/*/a"/>
  </xsl:call-template>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template name="gTraverse">
   <xsl:param name="pNode"/>
   <xsl:param name="pVisited" select="/.."/>
   <xsl:param name="pMustVisit" select="/.."/>

   <xsl:variable name="vnewVisited" select=
   "$pVisited | $pNode"/>

   <xsl:variable name="vnewNodes" select=
   "key('kNodeById',
         ($pNode/linkTo
        |
          /*/*[linkTo=$pNode/@id])/@id
          )
          [not(@id = $vnewVisited/@id)]
   "/>

   <xsl:variable name="vnewMustVisit" select=
    "$pMustVisit[count(.|$pNode) > 1] | $vnewNodes"/>

   <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="not($vnewMustVisit)">
     <xsl:copy-of select="$vnewVisited"/>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
      <xsl:call-template name="gTraverse">
       <xsl:with-param name="pNode" select=
       "$vnewMustVisit[1]"/>
       <xsl:with-param name="pVisited" select="$vnewVisited"/>
       <xsl:with-param name="pMustVisit" select=
       "$vnewMustVisit[position() > 1]"/>
      </xsl:call-template>
    </xsl:otherwise>
   </xsl:choose>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the following XML document, representing a 5-vertices directed graph:

<graph>
 <a id ="1">
  <linkTo>2</linkTo>
  <linkTo>5</linkTo>
 </a>
 <b id ="2">
  <linkTo>3</linkTo>
  <linkTo>5</linkTo>
 </b>
 <c id ="3">
  <linkTo>1</linkTo>
  <linkTo>4</linkTo>
 </c>
 <d id ="4">
  <linkTo>1</linkTo>
 </d>
 <e id ="5">
  <linkTo>3</linkTo>
  <linkTo>4</linkTo>
 </e>
 <f id ="6">
  <linkTo>1</linkTo>
 </f>
</graph>

the correct result (all nodes of the graph), is produced:

<a id="1">
   <linkTo>2</linkTo>
   <linkTo>5</linkTo>
</a>
<b id="2">
   <linkTo>3</linkTo>
   <linkTo>5</linkTo>
</b>
<c id="3">
   <linkTo>1</linkTo>
   <linkTo>4</linkTo>
</c>
<d id="4">
   <linkTo>1</linkTo>
</d>
<e id="5">
   <linkTo>3</linkTo>
   <linkTo>4</linkTo>
</e>
<f id="6">
   <linkTo>1</linkTo>
</f>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. It seems I got the solution taking cue from your answer. I shall update once I test. –  Kangkan Dec 23 '11 at 6:07
    
@Kangkan: You are welcome. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 23 '11 at 12:58

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