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I was asked this question in an interview.

How to print message on console without using main() method?

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3  
How would you start you're application without a main method? –  RoflcoptrException Dec 22 '11 at 14:17
9  
I cannot see this as a good interview question. Surely you want to test the applicant's problem solving ability, not knowledge of little used aspects of Java? –  Callum Rogers Dec 22 '11 at 15:50
9  
@CallumRogers +1 trivia are the worst kind of questions, anyone who ask those questions doesn't deserve to be my boss. –  Desmond Zhou Dec 22 '11 at 20:26
    
In Bash, just type 'echo <message>'. You should get extra points for doing the simplest thing possible too. –  fwielstra Dec 24 '11 at 12:27
    
Not possible in/after Java7 as main() method is looked up prior to loading classes. –  Aniket Thakur Aug 29 '13 at 9:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 50 down vote accepted
public class Foo {
    static {
         System.out.println("Message");
         System.exit(0);
    } 
}

The System.exit(0) exits program before the jvm starts to look for main()

Ideone link

(Note: even if it compiles with JDK 7's javac it cannot be run with its java, because it expects a main(String[]) method.)

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1  
@Roflcoptr $ java Foo just like any other –  Matt Ball Dec 22 '11 at 14:23
1  
@Roflcoptr java -cp . Foo like a program with main. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 22 '11 at 14:23
    
@Roflcoptr just compile the class and run java Foo it will load the class, print the message; and we exit before it starts to find the entry point for execution. –  Bala R Dec 22 '11 at 14:24
1  
@KohányiRóbert You're doing something wrong - maybe you mis-capitalized the class name in the file? It works for me with java 1.6.0_23. –  Erick Robertson Dec 22 '11 at 14:35
3  
@BalaR OK. I got it finally. Compiling it with JDK 6's javac I can run it with JRE/JDK 6's java but JRE/JDK 7's java won't run it. Compiling it with JDK 7's javac and you can't run it with nothing. Please update your answer. My comments before were too rash, however I knew that something was off. –  Kohányi Róbert Dec 22 '11 at 14:46
public final class Main {
    static {
        System.out.println("Hello World");
        System.exit(0);
    }
}

The static block is first executed as soon as the class is loaded before the main(); method is invoked and therefore before main() is called, System.exit(0) initiates VM shut down.

The System.exit method halts the execution of the current thread and all others dead in their tracks. When System.exit is called, the virtual machine performs two cleanup tasks before shutting down.

First, it executes all shutdown hooks that have been registered withRuntime.addShutdownHook. This is useful to release resources external to the VM. Use shutdown hooks for behavior that must occur before the VM exits.

The second cleanup task performed by the VM when System.exit is called concerns finalizers. If either System.runFinalizersOnExit or its evil twin Runtime.runFinalizersOnExit has been called, the VM runs the finalizers on all objects that have not yet been finalized. These methods were deprecated a long time ago and with good reason. Never call System.runFinalizersOnExit or Runtime.runFinalizersOnExit for any reason: They are among the most dangerous methods in the Java libraries. Calling these methods can result in finalizers being run on live objects while other threads are concurrently manipulating them, resulting in erratic behavior or deadlock.

In summary, System.exit stops all program threads immediately; it does not cause finally blocks to execute, but it does run shutdown hooks before halting the VM. Use shutdown hooks to terminate external resources when the VM shuts down. It is possible to halt the VM without executing shutdown hooks by calling System.halt, but this method is rarely used.

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In a file called A.java

class Con {
    String hi = "\n\nHello World\n\n";
}

You just have to compile the program on Windows. Not run it. :-P

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2  
This works because CON has special meaning on Windows, right? –  Matt Ball Dec 22 '11 at 14:23
3  
This also prints whole lot of other stuffs too. What is "Con" by the way? It doesn't let name the file as "Con.java". +1. –  Bhesh Gurung Dec 22 '11 at 14:32
9  
-1 Providing a platform-specific solution to a problem in a platform-independent language is incorrect. –  Erick Robertson Dec 22 '11 at 14:37
5  
@gurung CON is an old keyword used in DOS and carried forward into Windows as a shortcut for CONsole. You could copy a filename to CON and it would print on the screen. PRN is another keyword like this. I recently had problems storing stock data in folders because I used the stock name as the folder name and there was a stock called "CON". Windows still won't let you create a folder with this name. It says "The specified device name is invalid." –  Erick Robertson Dec 22 '11 at 14:43
11  
@ErickRobertson Given the nature of the question, I don't think they were looking for a best practice solution. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 22 '11 at 15:24
class MainMethodNot
{
    static
    {
        System.out.println("Hello World");
        System.exit(0);

    }
}

Because the static initializer block is executed when the class is first loaded, we can print out “Hello World” without writing a main method. The execution is stopped using “System.exit()” command. So, we prevent “main method not found” error. It's quite a tricky question

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You could define a custom class loader that prints your message :

public class MyClassLoader extends ClassLoader {
    public MyClassLoader(ClassLoader other) {
         super(other);
         System.out.println("Hi there");
         System.exit(0);
    }
}

Then run the java command :

java -Djava.system.class.loader=MyClassLoader

(don't need to add a class as parameter)

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protected by Community May 28 '13 at 8:18

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