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(Disclaimer: PostgreSQL newbie.)

OK, as far as I can tell, my function properly resembles the samples I've seen. Can someone clue me in as to how I get this to work?

create or replace function get_user_by_username(
    username varchar(250),
    online boolean
    ) returns setof record as $$
declare result record;
begin

    if online then 
        update users
        set last_activity = current_timestamp
        where user_name = username;
    end if;

    return query
    select
        user_id,
        user_name,
        last_activity,
        created,
        email,
        approved,
        last_lockout,
        last_login,
        last_password_changed,
        password_question,
        comment
    from
        users
    where
        user_name = username
    limit 1;

    return;
end;
$$ language plpgsql;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

if you would like to create function returning setof record, you'll need to define column types in your select statement

More info

Your query should look something like this:

select * from get_user_by_username('Username', True) as 
  f(user_id integer, user_name varchar, last_activity, varchar, created date, email        archar, approved boolean, last_lockout timestamp, last_login timestamp, 
  last_password_changed timestamp, password_question varchar, comment varchar)

(you will probably need to change the data types)

I personaly prefer the types approach. it assures that if the function is edited, all the queries will return correct results. It might be a pain because every time you modify function's arguments you'll need to recreate/drop types aswell tho.

Eg:

CREATE TYPE return_type as 
(user_id integer,
 user_name varchar,
 last_activity varchar,
 created timestamp,
 email varchar,
 approved boolean,
 last_lockout timestamp ,
 last_login timestamp,
 last_password_changed timestamp,
 password_question varchar,
 comment varchar);

create or replace function get_user_by_username( username varchar(250), online 

boolean) returns setof return_type as $$
declare _rec return_type;
begin
    if online then 
        update users
        set last_activity = current_timestamp
        where user_name = username;
    end if;
    for _rec in select
        user_id,
        user_name,
        last_activity,
        created,
        email,
        approved,
        last_lockout,
        last_login,
        last_password_changed,
        password_question,
        comment
      from
        users
      where
        user_name = username
      limit 1 
    loop

      return next _rec;

    end loop

end;
$$ language plpgsql;
share|improve this answer
    
How does the example define column types? To me it looks like it's just inserting rows. And isn't return query supposed to send the results back? Can you please give me an example of how I would change my function to satisfy the requirement? –  Jeremy Holovacs Dec 22 '11 at 14:29
    
i've placed an example in an edit –  ertx Dec 22 '11 at 14:32
    
Thanks... dunno why that wasn't shown on any of the documentation I was looking at. –  Jeremy Holovacs Dec 22 '11 at 15:20
1  
you can also use "out" arguments which kind of work like declaring a type, but you don't have to manage a separate object. –  araqnid Dec 22 '11 at 16:51

Return selected columns

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_user_by_username(_username text, _online bool)
  RETURNS TABLE (
    user_id int
   ,user_name text
   ,last_activity timestamp
   , ... ) AS
$func$
BEGIN

IF _online THEN
   RETURN QUERY
   UPDATE users u 
   SET    last_activity = current_timestamp
   WHERE  u.user_name = _username
   RETURNING
          u.user_id
         ,u.user_name
         ,u.last_activity
         , ... ;
ELSE
   RETURN QUERY
   SELECT u.user_id
         ,u.user_name
         ,u.last_activity
         , ...
   FROM   users u
   WHERE  u.user_name = _username;
END IF;

END
$func$  LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Call:

SELECT * FROM get_user_by_username('myuser', TRUE)

Major points

  • You had DECLARE result record; but didn't use the variable. I deleted the cruft.

  • You can return the record directly from the UPDATE, which is much faster than calling an additional SELECT statement. Use RETURN QUERY and UPDATE with a RETURNING clause.
    If the user is not _online, default to a plain SELECT.

  • If you don't table-qualify column names (tablename.columnname) in queries inside the function, be wary of naming conflicts between column names and named parameters, which are visible (most) everywhere inside a function.
    You can also avoid such conflicts by using positional references ($n) for parameters. Or use a prefix that you never use for column names: like an underscore (_username).

  • If users.username is defined unique in your table, then LIMIT 1 in the second query is just cruft.
    If it is not, then the UPDATE can update multiple rows, which is most likely wrong.
    I assumed a unique username and deleted the cruft.

  • Define the return type of the function (like @ertx demonstrated) or you will have to provide a column definition list in every function call, which is awkward.

  • Creating a type for that purpose (like @ertx proposed) is a valid approach, but probably overkill for a single function. That was the way to go in old versions of PostgreSQL before we had RETURNS TABLE for that purpose - like demonstrated above.

  • You do not need a loop for this simple function.

  • Every function needs a language declaration. LANGUAGE plpgsql in this case.

  • Probably no point in defining a length restriction (varchar(250)) for the parameter. I simplified to type text.

Return whole table

If you want to return all columns of table users, there is a simpler way. PostgreSQL automatically defines a composite type of the same name for every table. In this case you could use RETURNS SETOF users and vastly simplify the query:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_user_by_username(_username text, _online bool)
  RETURNS SETOF users AS
$func$
BEGIN

IF _online THEN
    RETURN QUERY
    UPDATE users u 
    SET    last_activity = current_timestamp
    WHERE  u.user_name = _username
    RETURNING u.*;
ELSE
    RETURN QUERY
    SELECT *
    FROM   users u
    WHERE  u.user_name = _username;
END IF;

END
$func$  LANGUAGE plpgsql;
share|improve this answer
1  
Very clean. Ertx got me to a place where I could figure out the rest, but this is an excellent writeup. I hope it clears up some confusion for other newbie PostgreSQL practitioners. –  Jeremy Holovacs Dec 23 '11 at 13:43
1  
Fantastic answer –  eggonlegs May 29 '12 at 12:39

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