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I am trying to have my page call a method and, if it fails, display an error in my mbResult control. However, since my method is a void method, I am having a hard time throwing the exception. If I throw it from the method end it will not display in my error box.

I have the following code in my my page:

try
{
    Facade.AcceptChanges();
} 
catch(FarAlreadyExistsException) 
{
    mbResult.Message = new MessageInfo(FutureActivitiesAlreadyExistsMessage);
    return;
}

the accept changes method is this

public void AcceptChanges() 
{
    try
    {
        DataContext.SaveChanges();
    }
    catch (Exception) 
    {
        return;
    }
}
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3  
Swallowing exceptions in this way is not a good thing. –  Oded Dec 22 '11 at 14:31
2  
catch (Exception) { return; } This is very bad practice. –  asawyer Dec 22 '11 at 14:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Remove the second try-catch to let the exception get caught in your first catch block:

public void AcceptChanges() 
{
    DataContext.SaveChanges();
}

EDIT: It seems you should also apply the following change:

try
{
    Facade.AcceptChanges();
} 
catch(Exception) // according to the documentation, this should be an OptimisticConcurrencyException
{
    mbResult.Message = new MessageInfo(FutureActivitiesAlreadyExistsMessage);
    return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tryed this but my program stopped at DataContext –  HELP_ME Dec 22 '11 at 14:51
    
what do you mean by "stopped"? Did you maybe get a different Exception than FarAlreadyExistsException? –  codesparkle Dec 22 '11 at 14:54
public void AcceptChanges() {
            try
            {
                DataContext.SaveChanges();
            }
            catch (Exception cause) {
                throw new FarAlreadyExistsException(cause);
            }
        }

You don't throw the exception, so you aren't going to catch it in the try-catch of the first method

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Thanks this worked perfectly –  HELP_ME Dec 22 '11 at 14:56
2  
swallowing the original Exception is a bad practice. You should pass along the cause as well: catch (Exception e) { throw new FarAlreadyExistsException(e); } –  codesparkle Dec 22 '11 at 15:05
    
I totally agree. –  Jesse van Assen Dec 22 '11 at 15:11

You shouldn't handle the exception in AcceptChanges if you're not going to do anything. It's just swallowing the error, so your outer try...catch block won't see it (and the code in the catch block won't get triggered.

Remove the try...catch within your AcceptChanges method then the catch code in the method that calls it will catch the exception (as long as it's of the correct type.

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Doesn't answer the question. This would make a better comment (which someone has already left). –  jadarnel27 Dec 22 '11 at 14:33
    
I'm answering the question of why isn't it thrown. So, i think i have answered the qusetion. (Possibly i ninja edited while you were commenting?) –  George Duckett Dec 22 '11 at 14:34
    
Yep. All you answer said when I commented was "You shouldn't handle the exception in AcceptChanges if you're not going to do anything" - which is a comment, not an answer. –  jadarnel27 Dec 22 '11 at 14:37
    
@jadarnel27: It's not a comment, it IS the answer. The exception swallowing is what was causing the original questioner's problem. –  Christopher McAtackney Dec 22 '11 at 14:40
    
@C.McAtackney I respectfully disagree. When I applied my downvote, this was not an answer - it was a comment. Now it is an answer (after ninja-editing), albeit the same as all the other answers. –  jadarnel27 Dec 22 '11 at 14:47

Don't have the generic try-catch statement inside the AcceptChanges() method. Let the Exception that occurs inside DataContext.SaveChanges() bubble up to your try-catch inside the first section of code.

You should only handle exceptions that you are expecting (unless you really don't care if a piece of code fails). And you should only handle exceptions in the exact places that care about the exception.

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You are swallowing the exception in AcceptChanges. Remove the Try;Catch; in AcceptChanges and let it bubble up.

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You shouldn't catch the exception in AcceptChanges() then and let first try-catch block handle it.

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