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If I make a function inline does it change its linkage to internal linkage? For example: I'm using or calling the inline function in two files:

file1.cpp

//function definition
inline void foo() {}

file2.cpp
//function definition
inline void foo() {}

Why do I need to define the inline function in each file to be able to call it? I'm getting an internal linkage? What if I use static inline?

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While I know the tag is C++, its good to know that inlines in C are by default internal linkage, the opposite of C++ –  Jesse Good Dec 22 '11 at 15:09
    
@Jesse: No its not the opposite. Inline function C (C99) also have external linkage by default unless declared static. –  user1086635 Dec 22 '11 at 15:32
    
@user1086635: No, in C the default is internal linkage. C99 6.7.4/6 says "An inline definition does not provide an external definition for the function, and does not forbid an external definition in another translation unit.", giving an example creating an external definition with an extra extern declaration. –  Mike Seymour Dec 22 '11 at 15:50
    
@MikeSeymour: I see, so declaring the inline function declaration with extern makes it have external linkage otherwise it gets an internal linkage by default. –  user1086635 Dec 22 '11 at 16:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If I make a function inline does it change its linkage to internal linkage?

No, making it inline does not change its linkage.

Why do I need to define the inline function in each file to be able to call it?

Because the language requires it. C++11 7.1.2/4 says "An inline function shall be defined in every translation unit in which it is odr-used and shall have exactly the same definition in every case."

I'm getting an internal linkage?

No, it still has external linkage: a pointer to the function will have the same value in any translation unit, and any static objects declared inside the function will be the same object in any translation unit.

What if I use static inline?

That will give internal linkage, due to the static. This means that definitions in separate translation units will produce separate functions, with different addresses and distinct copies of any static objects.

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Okay, If I had each inline function declared as static in those two files, how would it affect my program? Because even if the functions have extenal linkage their definitions still needs to present in each file. –  user1086635 Dec 22 '11 at 14:56
1  
@user1086635: If you declare them static, then each will be a separate function; for example, their addresses will be different, and each will have its own copy of any static data. With external linkage, they will have the same address and will share static data. –  Mike Seymour Dec 22 '11 at 14:58
    
The note about pointers to an inline is not specified. Multiple copies of the inline function may exist -- as each translation unit gets a copy. It is then undefined how a linker resolves that. If you violate the ODR rule you can get weird results like different functions being called. Thus you can't assume the pointers will be the same either, even if you follow the ODR. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Dec 22 '11 at 15:38
2  
@edA-qamort-ora-y: 7.1.2/4 also says "An inline function with external linkage shall have the same address in all translation units." –  Mike Seymour Dec 22 '11 at 15:44
    
Indeed it does. I wonder if I can somehow trick gcc/ld into doing the wrong thing here and giving me two addresses -- without violating the ODR. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Dec 22 '11 at 15:51

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