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Ok I need a small wrapper of fmt.Printf() for debugging conveniance :

1/ "too many arguments in call to fmt.Fprintln" :

func Debug (a ... interface{}) {
    if debug {
        fmt.Fprintln(out, prefix, sep, a...)
    }
}

2/ "name list not allowed in interface type" :

func Debug (a ... interface{}) {
    if debug {
        fmt.Fprintln(out, []interface{prefix, sep, a...}...)
    }
}

3/ Works, but feels wrong :

func Debug (a ... interface{}) {
    if debug {
        sl := make ([]interface{}, len(a) + 2)
        sl[0] = prefix
        sl[1] = sep
        for i, v := range a {
            sl[2+i] = v
        }

        fmt.Fprintln(out, sl...)
    }
}

Any ideas to avoid allocating extra memory ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Variadic arguments can be used as slices, so no need to allocate a new one:

func Debug(a ...interface{}) {
    if debug {
            a = append(a, 0)
            copy(a[1:], a[0:])
            a[0] = prefix + sep
            fmt.Fprintln(out, a...)
    }
}

See http://play.golang.org/p/xXEO58BJoA for a working example

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I would just do two prints:

func Debug(a ...interface{}) {
    if debug {
        fmt.Fprint(out, prefix, sep)
        fmt.Fprintln(out, a...)
    }
}

If you believed you needed to make a single call to Fprint, you could do,

func Debug(a ...interface{}) {
    if debug {
        fmt.Fprint(out, prefix, sep, fmt.Sprintln(a...))
    }
}

Either way seems simpler that building a new slice.

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I would write:

func Debug(a ...interface{}) {
    if debug {
        aa := make([]interface{}, 0, 2+len(a))
        aa = append(append(aa, prefix, sep), a...)
        fmt.Fprintln(out, aa...)
    }
}

The allocation is only made in debug mode, so why is the number of Debug function allocations significant?

The Go fmt package is expensive because of its generality; it uses reflection, it allocates, and it does I/O. Why are the Debug function allocations relatively significant?

Have you considered using the Go log package?

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1  
len(aa) should be initially 0. –  Atom Dec 22 '11 at 16:04
    
Alright thank's, I'll have a look at the log package, seems interesting. To answer your question : it's not significant, really. It's more a general concern. Thank's to both of you for append() func though, didn't know about it and was wondering how to add elements to slices @Atom why is that ? It's growing towards len(a)+2 anyway –  r---------k Dec 22 '11 at 16:38
    
Fixed len(aa). Thanks. –  peterSO Dec 22 '11 at 16:39
    
For aa := make([]interface{}, 2+len(a)), len(aa) = 2+len(a) and cap(aa) = 2+len(a). For, aa :+ make([]interface{}, 0, 2+len(a)), len(aa) = 0 and cap(aa) = 2+len(a). append starts appending at len(aa). –  peterSO Dec 22 '11 at 16:54

There is no way to avoid allocating extra memory.

The shortest and most efficient Go code seems to be:

func Debug (a ...interface{}) {
    if debug {
        b := make([]interface{}, 0, 2+len(a))
        b = append(b, prefix, sep)
        b = append(b, a...)
        fmt.Fprintln(out, b...)
    }
}

Minor note: In your 2nd example, you are missing a {}:

fmt.Fprintln(out, []interface{}{prefix, sep}...)
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