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I would like to do something like join with an Array, but instead of getting the result as a String, I would like to get an Array. I will call this interpolate. For example, given:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

I expect:

a.interpolate(0) # => [1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5]  
a.interpolate{Array.new} # => [1, [], 2, [], 3, [], 4, [], 5]

What is the best way to get this? The reason I need it to take a block is because when I use it with a block, I want different instances for each interpolator that comes in between.


After getting great answers from many, I came up with some modified ones.

This one is a modification from tokland's answer. I made it accept nil for conj1. And also moved if conj2 condition to outside of the flat_map loop to make it faster.

class Array
    def interpolate conj1 = nil, &conj2
        return [] if empty?
        if conj2 then first(length - 1).flat_map{|e| [e, conj2.call]}
        else          first(length - 1).flat_map{|e| [e, conj1]}
        end << last
    end
end

This one is a modification of Victor Moroz's answer. I added the functionality to accept a block.

class Array
    def interpolate conj1 = nil, &conj2
        return [] if empty?
        first, *rest = self
        if conj2 then rest.inject([first]) {|a, e| a.push(conj2.call, e)}
        else          rest.inject([first]) {|a, e| a.push(conj1, e)}
        end
    end
end

After benchmark test, the second one looks faster. It seems that flat_map, although looking beautiful, is slow.

share|improve this question
    
Why the block with Array.new? can't you just pass that as a parameter? –  Linuxios Dec 22 '11 at 15:45
    
@Linux_iOS.rb.cpp.c.lisp.m.sh Maybe my example was not good, but sometimes, I need different instances for each interpolator. –  sawa Dec 22 '11 at 16:10
    
That makes sense. That means my answer is worth nothing. Sorry. –  Linuxios Dec 22 '11 at 17:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not really sure what you want to do with a block, but I would do it this way:

class Array
  def interpolate(sep)
    h, *t = self
    t.empty? ? [h] : t.inject([h]) { |a, e| a.push(sep, e) }
  end
end

UPDATE:

Benchmarks (array size = 100):

            user     system      total        real
inject  0.730000   0.000000   0.730000 (  0.767565)
zip     1.030000   0.000000   1.030000 (  1.034664)

Actually I am a bit surprised, I thought zip would be faster.

UPDATE2:

zip is faster, flatten is not.

share|improve this answer
    
I like your idea about h, *t = self, but isn't inject heavy? I am wondering which is faster between your answer and createing an array and zipping it like lucapette's answer. –  sawa Dec 22 '11 at 16:27
    
It looks like your answer is very fast. Thank you for the benchmark. –  sawa Dec 23 '11 at 4:25

Use zip:

a.zip(Array.new(a.size) { 0 }).flatten(1)[0...-1]
share|improve this answer
    
On my system it yields [[1, 0], [2, 0], [3, 0]] which is far from desired output :-) –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 22 '11 at 16:07
    
I guess you forget .flatten(1)[0...-1], besides it creates new array which you don't need in fact –  Victor Moroz Dec 22 '11 at 16:07
    
@VictorMoroz yep I pasted the wrong line ;) –  lucapette Dec 22 '11 at 16:23
1  
"wondering which is faster", don't wonder, benchmark! But, considering that zip is written in C I will go with it as being faster. –  the Tin Man Dec 22 '11 at 16:48
3  
"Which is faster" ... don't worry about it unless you have a large enough data set and observe a problem. Go with code readability, and if there is a slowdown, use profiling tools and benchmarks to trace the bottleneck. –  DGM Dec 22 '11 at 18:05

Another way

class Array
  def interpolate(pol=nil)
    new_ary = self.inject([]) do |memo, orig_item|
      pol = yield if block_given?
      memo += [orig_item, pol]
    end
    new_ary.pop
    new_ary
  end
end

[1,2,3].interpolate("A")
#=> [1, "A", 2, "A", 3]

[1,2,3].interpolate {Array.new}
#=> [1, [], 2, [], 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I see that your answer is superiour in that it allows nil for pol. But I am a bit concerned that inject might be heavy. –  sawa Dec 22 '11 at 16:44
    
I did benchmark, and it seems that += is heavy. inject is not. –  sawa Dec 23 '11 at 15:41
class Array
  def interpolate_with val
    res = []
    self.each_with_index do |el, idx|
      res << val unless idx == 0
      res << el
    end
    res
  end
end

Usage:

ruby-1.9.3-p0 :021 > [1,2,3].interpolate_with 0
 => [1, 0, 2, 0, 3] 
ruby-1.9.3-p0 :022 > [1,2,3].interpolate_with []
 => [1, [], 2, [], 3] 
share|improve this answer
    
This looks nice. I am comparing this with other answers. –  sawa Dec 22 '11 at 16:28

Here's a simple version (which can handle multiple values and/or a block) using flat_map and each_cons:

class Array
  def interpolate *values
    each_cons(2).flat_map do |e, _|
      [e, *values, *(block_given? ? yield(e) : [])]
    end << last
  end
end

[1,2,3].interpolate(0, "") # => [1, 0, "", 2, 0, "", 3]
[1,2,3].interpolate(&:even?) # => [1, false, 2, true, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
That's clean. Thanks. –  sawa Dec 23 '11 at 3:58

This does it inplace:

class Array
  def interpolate(t = nil)
    each_with_index do |e, i|
      t = yield if block_given?
      insert(i, t) if i % 2 == 1
    end
  end
end

This works because t is inserted before the element with the current index, which makes the just inserted t the element with the current index, which means that the iteration can continue normally.

share|improve this answer

So many ways to do this. For example (Ruby 1.9):

class Array
  def intersperse(item = nil)
    return clone if self.empty?
    take(self.length - 1).flat_map do |x|
      [x, item || yield]
    end + [self.last]
  end
end

p [].intersperse(0)
#=> []

p [1, 2, 3, 4, 5].intersperse(0)
#= >[1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5]

p [1, 2, 3, 4, 5].intersperse { 0 }
#= >[1, 0, 2, 0, 3, 0, 4, 0, 5]

(I use the Haskell function name: intersperse.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That is very close to what I wanted. –  sawa Dec 22 '11 at 16:43
    
I think you can loosen the return condition to if self.empty? –  sawa Dec 22 '11 at 16:51
    
@sawa, it is considered bad form to edit someone's answer. You can edit your question to append your version, or you can add a comment to theirs. Editing of answers should be spelling, formatting for readability, etc., but the code should be sacrosanct. –  the Tin Man Dec 22 '11 at 16:52
    
@sawa: indeed, edited using "empty?". I don't really mind that you edited the question, but the Tin Man is right, it's better to create a separate answer. –  tokland Dec 22 '11 at 16:56
    
I like the beauty or your code, but after intensive benchmark test, Victor Moroz's answer with modification to allow proc seems to be the fastest. –  sawa Dec 23 '11 at 4:36

Here is one way:

theArray.map {|element| [element, interpolated_obj]}.flatten
share|improve this answer
3  
You'll have interpolated_obj as the last element of the result and that doesn't look like desired behavior. –  KL-7 Dec 22 '11 at 15:52

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