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This is a dumb question, admittedly, please don't hesitate to vote down. :)

I was debugging the other day and came across some memory- and register-fills I hadn't seen before on some embedded hardware I'm using. So I started a mental catalog. For example:

DEADBEEF, BAADF00D, D15EA5ED, DECEA5ED, BAA5H33P...

Something that sticks out when you look at the memory viewer and is vaguely related to what it's about (deleted memory, no-man's land, outerwear...).

It got me thinking - is there a generator for these?? Something like a l33t name generator except limited to hex numbers (hexits?).

Your prompt and careful attention to this serious matter is greatly appreciated.

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
$ grep -i '^[abcdefols]*$' /usr/share/dict/words | tr ols 015
abaca
abed
abe1e
ab1
ab1e
ab0de
ab0ded
acc
accede
acceded
.
.
.

0ff
0ffa1
0ffed
0ff10ad
0ff10aded
01de
01e0
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very succinct answer –  Joe Koberg May 13 '09 at 23:20
    
grep -i '^[abcdefolst]*$' /usr/share/dict/words | tr olst 0157 –  jreid9001 Apr 19 '12 at 0:11
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BAA5H33P??

It contains both an H and a P? Those aren't valid hex digits.

You missed Java's famous CAFEBABE

You can read more on it at Wikipedia, including :
CAB1E (cable)
FACE
BEAD
C0ED
etc, etc....

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Ok the BAA5H33P was a joke –  Scott Bilas May 13 '09 at 22:31
1  
While we're on the subject of Java, I like 0xDECAFBAD :) –  Matt J May 13 '09 at 22:32
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Ah ha! "Hexspeak" was the keyword I needed for the Googles.

Here is a Python program to find all Hexspeak words. And a list of what that program found.

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My brain is fuzzy today, but this works. Alter to taste...

#!/usr/local/bin/python
letters = {'A':'A', 'B':'B', 'C':'C', 'D':'D', 'E':'E', 'F':'F', 'I':'1', 'O':'0', 'S':'5'}
f = open('/usr/share/dict/words', 'r')
for line in f:
    line = line[:-1]
    if len(line) < 4:
        continue
    word = ""
    goodword = True
    for c in list(line):
        if c.upper() not in letters.keys():
            goodword = False
        else:
            word += letters[c.upper()]
    if goodword:
        print "%20s\t%s" % (line,word)
f.close()
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