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I am checking the difference between two implementations of gradient descent, my guess was that with after compiler optimization both versions of the algorithm would be equivalent.

For my surprise, the recursive version was significantly faster. I haven't discard an actual defect on any of the versions or even in the way I am measuring the time. Can you guys give me some insights please?

This is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdint.h>

double f(double x)
{
        return 2*x;
}

double descgrad(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision)
{
//      printf("step ... x:%f Xp:%f, delta:%f\n",xo,xnew,fabs(xnew - xo));

        if (fabs(xnew - xo) < precision)
        {
                return xnew;
        }
        else
        {
                descgrad(xnew, xnew - eps*f(xnew), eps, precision);
        }
}

double descgraditer(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision)
{
        double Xo = xo;
        double Xn = xnew;

        while(fabs(Xn-Xo) > precision)
        {
                //printf("step ... x:%f Xp:%f, delta:%f\n",Xo,Xn,fabs(Xn - Xo));
                Xo = Xn;
                Xn = Xo - eps * f(Xo);
        }

        return Xn;
}

int64_t timespecDiff(struct timespec *timeA_p, struct timespec *timeB_p)
{
  return ((timeA_p->tv_sec * 1000000000) + timeA_p->tv_nsec) -
           ((timeB_p->tv_sec * 1000000000) + timeB_p->tv_nsec);
}

int main()
{
        struct timespec s1, e1, s2, e2;

        clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &s1);
        printf("Minimum : %f\n",descgraditer(100,99,0.01,0.00001));
        clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &e1);

        clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &s2);
        printf("Minimum : %f\n",descgrad(100,99,0.01,0.00001));
        clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &e2);

        uint64_t dif1 = timespecDiff(&e1,&s1) / 1000;
        uint64_t dif2 = timespecDiff(&e2,&s2) / 1000;

        printf("time_iter:%llu ms, time_rec:%llu ms, ratio (dif1/dif2) :%g\n", dif1,dif2, ((double) ((double)dif1/(double)dif2)));

        printf("End. \n");
}

I am compiling with gcc 4.5.2 on Ubuntu 11.04 with the following options: gcc grad.c -O3 -lrt -o dg

The output of my code is:

Minimum : 0.000487
Minimum : 0.000487
time_iter:127 ms, time_rec:19 ms, ratio (dif1/dif2) :6.68421
End.

I read a thread which also ask about a recursive version of an algorithm being faster than the iterative one. The explanation over there was that being the recursive version using the stack and the other version using some vectors the access on the heap was slowing down the iterative version. But in this case (in the best of my understanding) I am just using the stack on both cases.

Am I missing something? Anything obvious that I am not seeing? Is my way of measuring time wrong? Any insights?

EDIT: Mystery solved in a comment. As @TonyK said the initialization of the printf was slowing down the first execution. Sorry that I missed that obvious thing.

BTW, The code compiles just right without warnings. I don't think the "return descgrad(.." is necessary since the stop condition is happening before.

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8  
All "why is it faster?" questions should be accompanied by the assembly code listing output from your compiler. –  Greg Hewgill Dec 22 '11 at 17:37
1  
Where is the return statment for descgrad for the case when the if statement is false? This code shouldn't compile. –  Christopher Neylan Dec 22 '11 at 17:40
    
@user112358132134: nah, it should just compile with a warning, no? –  Dan Fego Dec 22 '11 at 17:41
4  
I'm not convinced its faster. You need to iterate over both calls many times to average over jitter. You need to remove printf from the benchmarked section. –  totowtwo Dec 22 '11 at 17:43
1  
What do you get if you run the timing tests in the other order (first descgrad, then descgraditer)? It might be printf initialisation that takes all that time, as totowtwo implies. –  TonyK Dec 22 '11 at 17:47
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7 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I've compiled and run your code locally. Moving the printf outside of the timed block makes both versions execute in ~5ms every time.

So a central mistake in your timing is that you measure the complex beast of printf and its runtime dwarfs the code you are actually trying to measure.

My main()-function now looks like this:

int main() {
    struct timespec s1, e1, s2, e2;

    double d = 0.0;

    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &s1);
    d = descgraditer(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &e1);
    printf("Minimum : %f\n", d);

    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &s2);
    d = descgrad(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &e2);
    printf("Minimum : %f\n",d);

    uint64_t dif1 = timespecDiff(&e1,&s1) / 1000;
    uint64_t dif2 = timespecDiff(&e2,&s2) / 1000;

    printf("time_iter:%llu ms, time_rec:%llu ms, ratio (dif1/dif2) :%g\n", dif1,dif2, ((double) ((double)dif1/(double)dif2)));

    printf("End. \n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. this does make ton of sense! –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 18:21
    
this answer is incorrect. i cannot reproduce its results, especially over several function iterations. –  Christopher Neylan Dec 22 '11 at 19:20
    
@user112358132134 What exactly you couldn't reproduce? I could indeed confirm that those printf were slowing down the execution of the first function. If you comment out both printf's the execution time should be close for both functions. –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 19:55
    
i posted an answer. in short, the difference in execution times was the result of -O3's tail call optimization. –  Christopher Neylan Dec 22 '11 at 20:06
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Is my way of measuring time wrong?

Yes. In the short timespans you are measuring, the scheduler can have a massive impact on your program. You need to either make your test much longer to average such differences out, or to use CLOCK_PROCESS_CPUTIME_ID instead to measure the CPU time used by your process.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds fair but it doesn't explain the significant difference between them though? both times are not even close –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 17:58
    
@Pedrom: Yes, but a noninterative process getting no CPU time for 0.1 seconds is entirely possible. Additionally, like totowtwo noted, the printf statement introduces more delay like potentially uncommitted buffers, which introduce more unpredictable slowdowns. Your algorithm might only take 10 ms for both variants, and the rest is noise, so there is no significance in the difference. –  thiton Dec 22 '11 at 18:03
    
yeap you're are... the printf was making the noise. –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 18:13
add comment

For one thing, your recursive step misses a return:

double descgrad(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision)
{
    if (fabs(xnew - xo) < precision)
        return xnew;
    else
        descgrad(xnew, xnew - eps*f(xnew), eps, precision);
}

Should be:

double descgrad(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision)
{
    if (fabs(xnew - xo) < precision)
        return xnew;
    else
        return descgrad(xnew, xnew - eps*f(xnew), eps, precision);
}

This oversight causes the return value of descgrad to be undefined, so the compiler barely has to generate code for it at all ;)

share|improve this answer
    
I just tested this theory, and it does not change the OP's observation. –  Christopher Neylan Dec 22 '11 at 17:46
    
@user112358132134: Fair enough. After testing locally, I can reproduce your findings. –  Magnus Hoff Dec 22 '11 at 17:54
    
I don't think it is necessary since the stopping condition is "return xnew" and both function returned the right value. Moreover, I tried again with the code that you proposed and there was not change over the performance. –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 17:56
    
@Pedrom: It is absolutely critical to have the return there to get a correct program. However, it does not seem to affect the runtime, as I've already stated. If it produces the correct output, it is only by chance. –  Magnus Hoff Dec 22 '11 at 18:00
    
@MagnusHoff Sorry for disagree Magnus, but either the compiler is fixing it for me or it is not necessary. What I am expecting is the stack environment to be reused on each call and then return the value to stop the recursion since I am not leaving pending operations. It might be wrong but please if that is not the case why it is working? –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 18:19
show 3 more comments

For starters, you were including a printf in the time you were trying to measure. It's always a giant no-no because it can, and most likely will, suspend your process while doing the console output. Actually doing ANY system call can completely throw off time measurements like these.

And secondly, as someone else mentioned, on this short of a sampling period, scheduler interrupts can have a huge impact.

This is not perfect, but try this for your main and you'll see there's actually very little difference. As you increase the loop count, the ratio approaches 1.0.

#define LOOPCOUNT 100000
int main() 
{
    struct timespec s1, e1, s2, e2;
    int i;
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &s1);
    for(i=0; i<LOOPCOUNT; i++)
    {
      descgraditer(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
    }
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &e1);

    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &s2);
    for(i=0; i<LOOPCOUNT; i++)
    {
      descgrad(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
    }
    clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &e2);

    uint64_t dif1 = timespecDiff(&e1,&s1) / 1000;
    uint64_t dif2 = timespecDiff(&e2,&s2) / 1000;

    printf("time_iter:%llu ms, time_rec:%llu ms, ratio (dif1/dif2) :%g\n", dif1,dif2, ((double) ((double)dif1/(double)dif2)));

    printf("End. \n");

}

EDIT: After looking at the disassembled output using objdump -dS I noticed a few things:
With -O3 optimization, the above code optimizes the function call away completely. However, it does still produce code for the two functions and neither is actually recursive.

Secondly, with -O0, such that the resulting code is actually recursive, the recursive version is literally a trillion times slower. My guess is because the call stack forces variables to end up in memory where the iterative version runs out of registers and/or cache.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the insight. I tried with -O0 before but gcc is not generating the code that I expected. I expected it worked like Scheme where if you do not have pending operations it would reuse the environment. Actually with -O0 there is not way to have a recursion function that iterates forever, it always would end in a stack overflow (segmentation fault in gcc case). –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 18:39
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First, clock_gettime seems to be measuring wall clock time, not execution time. Second, the actual time you're measuring is the execution time of printf, not the execution time of your function. And third, the first time you call printf, it isn't in memory, so it has to be paged in, involving significant disk IO. Inverse the order you run the tests, and the results will inverse as well.

If you want to get some significant measurements, you have to make sure that

  1. only the code you want to measure is in the measurement loops, or at least, the additional code is very minimum compared to what you're measuring,
  2. you do something with the results, so that the compiler can't optimize all of the code out (not a problem in your tests),
  3. you execute the code to be measured a large number of times, taking the average,
  4. you measure CPU time, and not wall clock time, and
  5. you make sure that everything is paged in before starting the measurements.
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The accepted answer is incorrect.

There IS a difference in the runtimes of the iterative function and the recursive function and the reason is the compiler optimization -foptimize-sibling-calls added by -O3.

First, the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdint.h>

double descgrad(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision){
        if (fabs(xnew - xo) <= precision) {
                return xnew;
        } else {
                return descgrad(xnew, xnew - eps*2*xnew, eps, precision);
        }
}

double descgraditer(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision){
        double Xo = xo;
        double Xn = xnew;

        while(fabs(Xn-Xo) > precision){
                Xo = Xn;
                Xn = Xo - eps * 2*Xo;
        }
        return Xn;
}

int main() {
        time_t s1, e1, d1, s2, e2, d2;
        int i, iter = 10000000;
        double a1, a2;

        s1 = time(NULL);
        for( i = 0; i < iter; i++ ){
            a1 = descgraditer(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
        }
        e1 = time(NULL);
        d1 = difftime( e1, s1 );

        s2 = time(NULL);
        for( i = 0; i < iter; i++ ){
            a2 = descgrad(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
        }
        e2 = time(NULL);
        d2 = difftime( e2, s2 );

    printf( "time_iter: %d s, time_rec: %d s, ratio (iter/rec): %f\n", d1, d2, (double)d1 / d2 ) ;
    printf( "return values: %f, %f\n", a1, a2 );
}

Previous posts were correct in pointing out that you need to iterate many times in order to average away environment interference. Given that, I discarded your differencing function in favor of time.h's difftime function on time_t data, since over many iterations, anything finer than a second is meaningless. In addition, I removed the printfs in the benchmark.

I also fixed a bug in the recursive implementation. Your original code's if-statement checked for fabs(xnew-xo) < precision, which is incorrect (or at least different from the iterative implementation). The iterative loops while fabs() > precision, therefore the recursive function should not recurse when fabs <= precision. Adding 'iteration' counters to both functions confirms that this fix makes the function logically equivalent.

Compiling and running with -O3:

$ gcc test.c -O3 -lrt -o dg
$ ./dg
time_iter: 34 s, time_rec: 0 s, ratio (iter/rec): inf
return values: 0.000487, 0.000487

Compiling and running without -O3

$ gcc test.c -lrt -o dg
$ ./dg
time_iter: 54 s, time_rec: 90 s, ratio (iter/rec): 0.600000
return values: 0.000487, 0.000487

Under no optimization, iteration performs BETTER than recursion.

Under -O3 optimization, however, recursion runs ten-million iterations in under a second. The reason is that it adds -foptimize-sibling-calls, which optimizes sibling and tail recursive calls, which is exactly what your recursive function is taking advantage of.

To be sure, I ran it will all -O3 optimizations EXCEPT -foptimize-sibling-calls:

$ gcc test.c -lrt -o dg  -fcprop-registers  -fdefer-pop -fdelayed-branch  -fguess-branch-probability -fif-conversion2 -fif-conversion -fipa-pure-const -fipa-reference -fmerge-constants   -ftree-ccp -ftree-ch -ftree-copyrename -ftree-dce -ftree-dominator-opts -ftree-dse -ftree-fre -ftree-sra -ftree-ter -funit-at-a-time -fthread-jumps -falign-functions  -falign-jumps -falign-loops  -falign-labels -fcaller-saves -fcrossjumping -fcse-follow-jumps  -fcse-skip-blocks -fdelete-null-pointer-checks -fexpensive-optimizations -fgcse  -fgcse-lm  -fpeephole2 -fregmove -freorder-blocks  -freorder-functions -frerun-cse-after-loop  -fsched-interblock  -fsched-spec -fschedule-insns  -fschedule-insns2 -fstrict-aliasing  -ftree-pre -ftree-vrp -finline-functions -funswitch-loops  -fgcse-after-reload -ftree-vectorize
$ ./dg
time_iter: 55 s, time_rec: 89 s, ratio (iter/rec): 0.617978
return values: 0.000487, 0.000487

Recursion, without the tail-call optimization, performs worse than iteration, in the same way as when compiled with NO optimization. Read about compiler optimizations here.

EDIT:

As a verification of correctness I updated my code include the return values. Also, I set two static variables to 0 and incremented each on recursion and iteration to verify correct output:

int a = 0;
int b = 0;

double descgrad(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision){
        if (fabs(xnew - xo) <= precision) {
                return xnew;
        } else {
                a++;
                return descgrad(xnew, xnew - eps*2*xnew, eps, precision);
        }
}

double descgraditer(double xo, double xnew, double eps, double precision){
        double Xo = xo;
        double Xn = xnew;

        while(fabs(Xn-Xo) > precision){
                b++;
                Xo = Xn;
                Xn = Xo - eps * 2*Xo;
        }
        return Xn;
}

int main() {
    time_t s1, e1, d1, s2, e2, d2;
    int i, iter = 10000000;
    double a1, a2;

    s1 = time(NULL);
    for( i = 0; i < iter; i++ ){
        a1 = descgraditer(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
    }
    e1 = time(NULL);
    d1 = difftime( e1, s1 );

    s2 = time(NULL);
    for( i = 0; i < iter; i++ ){
        a2 = descgrad(100,99,0.01,0.00001);
    }
    e2 = time(NULL);
    d2 = difftime( e2, s2 );

    printf( "time_iter: %d s, time_rec: %d s, ratio (iter/rec): %f\n", d1, d2, (double)d1 / d2 ) ;
    printf( "return values: %f, %f\n", a1, a2 );
    printf( "number of recurs/iters: %d, %d\n", a, b );
}

The output:

$ gcc optimization.c -O3 -lrt -o dg
$ ./dg
time_iter: 41 s, time_rec: 24 s, ratio (iter/rec): 1.708333
return values: 0.000487, 0.000487
number of recurs/iters: 1755032704, 1755032704

The answers are the same, and the repetition is the same.

Also interesting to note, the static variable fetching/incrementing has a considerable impact on the tail-call optimization, however recursion still out-performs iteration.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! this a very complete analysis of the code.. actually way more detailed than I expected. However I don't understand this result: time_iter: 34 s, time_rec: 0 s, ratio (iter/rec): inf <br/> It seems like the function is not giving the right answer because it seems really suspicious that after 10000000 iterations it wouldn't last at least 1s while the other one is 34s. I don't know just sounds weird... –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 20:21
    
and I couldn't reproduce it... I copy and pasted your code and compiled with -O3 and I still got the 1 ratio. –  Pedrom Dec 22 '11 at 20:29
    
perhaps this is also an environment issue. what did you test on? i tested on rhel5 with 5 cpus and 34gb of memory. this may have had an impact on my improved performance, though all that should do is exaggerate optimization benefits. i was also suspicious, so i set two static variables to 0 and ++'d them on each recur/interation and the resulting counts were the same (1755032704, if you want to verify; make sure you fix the <= bug). also interesting is the incrementing of the static variable destroys the tail optimization gain: time_iter: 34 s, time_rec: 24 s, ratio (iter/rec): 1.416667 –  Christopher Neylan Dec 22 '11 at 20:47
    
It seems definitely an environment issue. I tested on 2 PC both i5 core and results didn't change. From your findings looks like your code is somehow being executed in parallel. Is that even possible? –  Pedrom Dec 23 '11 at 12:30
1  
Why would exploiting tail recursion make the recursive function faster than the iterative one? The iterative version is reusing the variables just like the tail recursive call would. For reference I also get identical results for both functions using gcc 4.6.1 on Ubuntu 11.10 compiling with -O3. –  David Brown Dec 28 '11 at 10:02
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In many cases on modern hardware cache misses are the limiting factor of performance for small loop constructs. A recursive implementation is less likely to create cache misses on the instruction path.

share|improve this answer
    
Whereas a tight loop will not? I don't buy this. –  Michael Dorgan Dec 22 '11 at 21:21
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