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I am using Twilio in my rails 3.1.3 app and I have got everything basically set up, i.e. a controller for sms and xml builders for the views depending on the response. The only thing I can't figure out is how to keep track of the conversation. The Twilio docs are pretty bad for using anything other than PHP to do this. I have tried using the Rails session hash, session[:variable], but it doesn't seem to be saving the session, as I tried redirecting and printing it out and got nothing. Below is the code of the controller.

  def receive
    # Check for session variable and redirect if necessary
    @sms_state = session[:sms_state]
    if @sms_state == 'confirmation'
      redirect_to 'confirm'
    end
    if condition
      @sms_state = 'confirmation'
      session[:sms_state] = @sms_state
      render :action => "view.xml.builder", :layout => false
    else
      @sms_state = 'new_state'
      session[:sms_state] = @sms_state
      render :action => "error.xml.builder", :layout => false
    end
  end
  # method that should be called after user deals with first part
  def confirm
    if condition
      @sms_state = session[:sms_state] = nil
      render :action => "confirm_view.xml.builder", :layout => false
    else
      @sms_state = 'confirmation'
      session[:sms_state] = @sms_state
      render :action => "error.xml.builder", :layout => false
    end
  end

I have now set up a database table to track the current conversation state depending on the phone number contacting my app. The only thing now that I need to do is set an expiration for this conversation, just like a session or cookie. I am not sure how to do this or if its even possible.

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I believe this blog post, twilio.com/blog/2012/01/… , covers what you are looking for. In particular, look at the bottom part about Rails' protection against CSRF. –  mguymon Jan 29 '13 at 19:57
    
Yea thanks. I actually wrote that article after I figured it out, but thanks for reading it! –  acmeyer9 Feb 2 '13 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This depends on how you define "conversation", but in general, you are better off using some sort of persistance (would recommend database over a file), and build the structure in accordance with your definition of a conversation.

Suppose the conversation is defined as text messages between two 10-digit phone numbers without a time limit, you can setup a db with a sender and recipient attributes, so if you need to output something in a user interface, you can look for sender and recipient phone numbers, and display all messages coming to them or going from them.

SMS is different from a phone call, since you can set cookies for the session of a phone call. SMS is done when either delivered or sent. When you receive an SMS to a phone number or short code, Twilio will make a request to the URL you provided for SMS, and your app can then respond. If you receive another response, it's a brand new request, so you have to construct the notion of "conversation".

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So I have created a db table to add entries in depending on the phone number and state that the message is at. The only problem now that I am having is deleting this state after a certain amount of time. Is this possible to do? –  acmeyer9 Dec 28 '11 at 3:32
    
I'm not entirely sure what you are asking here - if you need to dump the data due to some constraints, you can create a process that periodically runs and cleans it up. Could you please elaborate on the reason for deleting it and the data structure you put in place? –  Sologoub Dec 28 '11 at 4:12
    
Sure, so basically I want to track a sms conversation, which I have done but once its over, a user has stopped sending text messages, I want to delete it so that the next time they text, the conversation starts at the beginning again. I would like to do it based on a time frame, like after 30 mins. –  acmeyer9 Dec 28 '11 at 14:00
1  
In that case, I'd just create a conversation ID and put a timestamp that you update each time a message is added to the conversation. When looking up whether to create a new conversation or use an existing one, put in constraint that you want to create a new ID if the last message in the original one is older than 30 minutes. –  Sologoub Dec 28 '11 at 18:32

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