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I am attempting to request html5 geolocation using an iFrame so that if two sites include the same iframe, and a user accepts permissions on the first site, he will not be prompted again for permission on the second site. This works great on Fire Fox, but I am not able to get to get it to work on Google Chrome.

The Scenario: I have two sites Domain-A and Domain-B. They both include the following iframe <iframe src="http://myglobalsite.com/iFrame.html"></iframe> and http://myglobalsite.com/iFrame.html contains code to request a user's geolocation using html5. [note: these urls are not real but just samples for my problem statement]

According to this article I found online, I expected that when the user visits Domain-A, he is prompted that 'myglobalsite.com is seeking permission to access location'. If the user grants permission to share location with 'myglobalsite.com', then Chrome should set 'ALLOW' on both the origin of the top-level document 'Domain-A' as well as the origin of the resource requesting permission 'myglobalsite.com'.

However, when I set this up, and visited 'Domain-A', and accepted the permissions, I noticed that Chrome had set the permissions of 'Domain-A' to 'ALLOW' but 'myglobalsite.com' to 'Undefined'.

Now visiting Domain-B, I am prompted again 'myglobalsite.com is seeking permission to access location' which breaks my use case.

I am not able to identify what I may have misconfigured. Any help will be appreciated.

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Did you ever figure this out? How can you tell which permissions Chrome gives to which domain? – Wes Gamble Sep 3 '14 at 20:55

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