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so I am shifting up a char into a long, then clearing, and doing it again. A shift of 15 makes my machine go wacky, see comment in code. What do you think is causing this.

This machine char 0x00, and long 0x0000 0000

    unsigned char temp;
    unsigned long open_code;

    temp = 0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<1);// open_code = 0x0000 0002 
    open_code = 0;
    //......    
    // 2 - 7    
    //....  
    temp = 0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<8); // open_code = 0x0000 0100 
    open_code = 0;  
    temp = 0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<9); // open_code = 0x0000 0200 
    open_code = 0;  
    temp = 0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<10); // open_code = 0x0000 0400 
    open_code = 0;  
    temp = 0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<11); // open_code = 0x0000 0800 
    open_code = 0;
    temp =  0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<12); // open_code = 0x0000 1000
    open_code = 0;  
    temp =  0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<13); // open_code = 0x0000 2000
    open_code = 0;  
    temp =  0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<14); // open_code = 0x0000 4000  
    open_code = 0;
    temp =  0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<15); // open_code = 0xFFFF 8000  !!!!!
    open_code = 0;
    temp =  0x01;
    open_code = open_code | (temp <<16); // open_code = 0x0000 0000  !!!!!
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have you tried copy char into a long first, then shifting it? –  Martin Beckett Dec 22 '11 at 20:12
    
Looks perfectly "normal" to me. Just an interaction of C's various casting rules (which are often inscrutable). –  Hot Licks Dec 22 '11 at 20:18
    
What platform are you on? –  Dave Rager Dec 22 '11 at 20:20
    
Zilog Z8 Encore! C-Compiler (microcontroller)The Zilog Z8 Encore! C-Compiler is a freestanding ANSI C compiler (see Freestanding Implementation), complying with the 1989 ISO standard, which is also known as ANSI Standard X3.159-1989 with some deviations, which are described in Deviations from ANSI C. –  eagletusk Dec 22 '11 at 20:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you're shifting an unsigned char too far and as a result inducing overflow. Try casting it to a long before shifting, like so:

open_code = open_code | (((long)temp) <<15);
share|improve this answer
1  
temp is promoted to an int before the shift operator is executed. The issue is likely related to int being signed but i haven't quite wrapped my head around why. –  Dave Rager Dec 22 '11 at 20:16
1  
@DaveRager: Does that mean my original answer was accurate? I suppose could just test it... –  Dan Fego Dec 22 '11 at 20:19
2  
@Dan, probably. I'm starting to wonder if ints are 16 bits on this platform. That might explain the sign extension when shift is 15. –  Dave Rager Dec 22 '11 at 20:21
1  
Personally I would just make temp unsigned int or unsigned long (depending on how much you need to shift them), so to avoid cluttering the code with casts and the "nice" surprises of shifting signed types and mixing them with unsigned ones. –  Matteo Italia Dec 22 '11 at 20:24
1  
@user2758, that definitely explains it. temp is promoted to an int (16 bits) then shifted giving you 0x8000. Because it is signed, when it is assigned to open_code, it is sign extended giving you 0xffff8000. When you shift 16, you overflow the 16 bit integer giving you 0x0000 and then 0x00000000. –  Dave Rager Dec 22 '11 at 20:27

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