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I do not know Ruby, but I am trying to understand this code for the Euler #17 problem. I understand the problem, and I understand the first few lines of the code. And, I googled about individual methods like puts and injects. I do not understand what the code is trying to do after |sum,n|.

Can some one translate it to some kind of pseudo-code?

This is the code:

digit = [ 4, 3, 3, 5, 4, 4, 3, 5, 5, 4, 3, 6, 6, 8, 8, 8, 7, 9, 8, 8 ]
decade = [4, 3, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 7, 6, 6]

puts (1..1000).inject(0) { |sum, n| 
  sum, n = sum + 11, n % 1000 if n > 999
  sum, n = sum + digit[n / 100] + (n % 100 > 0 ? 10 : 7), n % 100 if n > 99
  sum, n = sum + decade[n / 10], n % 10 if n > 19
  sum += digit[n] if n > 0
  sum
}
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If you understood puts and inject the rest is pseudocode as is. –  KL-7 Dec 22 '11 at 20:14
    
look up the Ruby Array class and Enumerate module. Then you're good. –  three Dec 22 '11 at 20:15
    
If I encountered someone using the "," operator to join lines to a conditional like that, I'd ding them in a code review. While it is a usable operator for joining operations, it is hardly common or idiomatic Ruby, and it doesn't speed up the code or make it more readable. Eschew that practice and follow the Ruby way of enlightened zen-like code. –  the Tin Man Dec 22 '11 at 20:48
    
Note that the author of this code himself says "In my attempt to learn Ruby out in the open". So it's the code of a beginner (at least in the language), so it's very unlikely that he comes up with the best approach. Personally I don't like the code at all, mathematicals problems (some would argue any programming is always about maths) ask for functional not imperative style. Too much re-biding of variables and changes of state. –  tokland Dec 22 '11 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

First, note that there's a mistake in that program: digit[15] should be 7, not 8.

I'm not sure if translating it to pseudocode would make it any clearer, but here is a line by line explanation:

sum, n = sum + 11, n % 1000 if n > 999

If n is at least 1000, add the number of non-space characters of the word one thousand into the running total sum, then replace n with the remainder of n divided by 1000. For example, if n were 1538, n % 1000 would be 538, thus removing the first digit.

sum, n = sum + digit[n / 100] + (n % 100 > 0 ? 10 : 7), n % 100 if n > 99

If n is at least 100, add the length of the name of the first digit, plus 7 (the length of the word hundred). If n is not a multiple of 100, you also need to add the word and, for a total of 10 characters. Then remove the first digit of n, as before.

sum, n = sum + decade[n / 10], n % 10 if n > 19

Now add the number of characters needed to express the first digit (twenty for 2, thirty for 3, etc...), provided that digit is at least 2. The "teens" are handled separately in the last line. Finally, replace n with its last digit.

sum += digit[n] if n > 0

At this point, n is either a single digit or a "teen", and the number of characters in its name are all precomputed in the digit array, so we add that value and we're done.


Some possibly obscure syntax features being used here:

  • Multiple assignment

    In ruby you can write statements like

    a, b = 3, 5
    

    to assign values to more than one variable simultaneously. There's no real reason to do so in this case, except to make the code shorter (though arguably less readable).

  • Postfix conditional

    Conditionals whose body has only 1 expression can be written in a postfix form. For example:

    puts "hi" if n > 0
    

    is exactly equivalent to:

    if n > 0
      puts "hi"
    end
    

    Again, this is used only to make the code shorter.

  • Ternary operator

    Yet another way to write a conditional expression:

    n > 0 ? n : 1
    

    translates to

    if n > 0
      n
    else
      1
    end
    

By "desugaring" all the special syntax explained above (and fixing the mistake about 15), the program becomes:

digit = [ 4, 3, 3, 5, 4, 4, 3, 5, 5, 4, 3, 6, 6, 8, 8, 7, 7, 9, 8, 8 ]
decade = [4, 3, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5, 7, 6, 6]

puts (1..1000).inject(0) { |sum, n|
  if n > 999
    sum += 11
    n = n % 1000
  end

  if n > 99
    sum += digit[n / 100] + 7
    if n % 100 > 0
      sum += 3
    end
    n = n % 100
  end

  if n > 19
    sum += decade[n / 10]
    n = n % 10
  end

  if n > 0
    sum += digit[n]
  end

  sum
}
share|improve this answer
    
So when it comes to second if statement , the new value of n is used to evaluate the condition . Is this correct. Also I was wondering that changing the value of n does not affect the loop because when I think of looping I think of for (n=0;n<=1000;n++) , but looks like because in the above case loop does not depend on n , it is not affected. –  user1110749 Dec 22 '11 at 21:16
    
Here's a gist with the inject removed and a for-in loop used instead to avoid the use of blocks. gist.github.com/29ee078033a901ae023e –  d11wtq Dec 22 '11 at 21:17
    
@user1110749 That is not a simple loop, but an inject statement. n is assigned a successive values from 1 to 1000 at each iteration, while the return value of the block is assigned to sum for the next iteration. So sum is a "running total", while n is each of the numbers from 1 to 1000. It doesn't matter if n is modified inside the block. –  Paolo Capriotti Dec 22 '11 at 21:25

I assume you are already familiar with modulo operand (n % 100) and ternary operator ( condition ? result_if_true : result_if_false)

The only two new concepts here are:

  • suffix condition

So, the code

sum += digit[n] if n > 0

is equivalent to

if n > 0
  sum += digit[n]
end
  • mass assignment

code

sum, n = sum + decade[n / 10], n % 10 if n > 19

is equivalent to

if n > 19
  sum = sum + decade[n / 10]
  n = n % 10
end

Now the code should be obvious.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply. I understand the suffix condition, but I do not understand the mass assignment example you quoted. Based on that I understand the that puts (1..1000) is like loop through 1 to 1000 and for each number n, all the three statements are checked and evaluated based on the condition. Now what I am not sure is after the sum is evaluated it is added together? Inside the loop does it fall through all the three sum statements? –  user1110749 Dec 22 '11 at 20:24
    
Can someone throw some more light on one of these statements individually for example sum, n = sum + 11, n % 1000 if n > 999 Is it specifying something like if n>999 {n=n%1000 sum= sum+n} As we have sum, n on the LHS of '=' operator, what does it specify –  user1110749 Dec 22 '11 at 20:33
    
Yes, inject operates on a collection (numbers from 1 to 1000 in this case). It applies given function to each element and sums returned results. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 22 '11 at 20:37
    
replaced my artificial example of mass assignment with real one –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 22 '11 at 20:39
    
Thank you for explaining n = sum + 11, n % 1000 if n > 999 –  user1110749 Dec 22 '11 at 20:58

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