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Unfortunately, taking a screenshot does no replicate the problem, so I'll have to explain.

My character is a QUAD with a texture bound to it. When I move this character in any direction, the 'back end' of the pixels have a green and red 'after-glow' or strip of pixels. Very hard to explain, but I am assuming it is a problem with the double buffering. Is there a known issue associated with moving sprites and trailing pixels?

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Not really, and without any more details, it's hard to diagnose. My only guess at this point is that you are only using a subset of the texture (i.e. your UVs are not just 0 and 1), and you have some colored pixels outside the rect you're drawing, and due to bilinear filtering, you catch a glimpse of them. Again, without any information, we can only stab in the dark. –  EboMike Dec 22 '11 at 20:37
    
I'll investigate this. Unfortunately a screen-cap of the issue doesn't pick it up. –  grep Dec 22 '11 at 21:11
    
CRT or LCD? If LCD, what's the pixel refresh rate? –  genpfault Dec 22 '11 at 21:27
    
LCD screen and 60 hertz –  grep Dec 22 '11 at 21:30
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@Headspin: You're redrawing the whole scene, or just trying to move the sprite without redrawing the rest of the scene? If the latter, that's your problem. In OpenGL always readraw the whole thing. –  datenwolf Dec 22 '11 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

My only guess at this point is that you are only using a subset of the texture (i.e. your UVs are not just 0 and 1), and you have some colored pixels outside the rect you're drawing, and due to bilinear filtering, you catch a glimpse of them.

When creating textures with alpha, be sure to create an outline around the visible part of the texture with the same color (i.e. if your texture is a brown wooden fence, make sure that all transparent pixels near the fence are brown too).

NOTE that some texture compression algorithms will remove the color value from a pixel if it is entirely transparent, so if necessary, write a test pixel shader that ignores alpha to make sure that your texture made it through the pipeline intact.

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