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As a learning exercise, I am creating a program that converts characters entered through argv[1] to integers. The program then finds the digital mean of the integers.

For example: abc would be 123, and 1+2+3 = 6, six being the digital mean. The first part of the program works, but I am unable to properly code the portion that finds the digital mean.

Output from word abc should be 123 6; instead it is 123 150.


EDIT: Solved!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <strings.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char stra[27], strb[0];
    int str_num, str_len;
    int final = 0;

    if (argv[1][0] < 'a')
    {
        printf("!Argument missing!");
        return 0;
    }

    strcpy(stra, argv[1]);
    str_len = strlen(stra);

    for (str_num = 0; str_num < str_len; str_num++)
    {
        if (stra[str_num] <= 'z' && stra[str_num] >= 'a')
        {
            strb[str_num] = (stra[str_num] - 'a' + 1) % 9 + '0';
            if (strb[str_num] == '0')
            {
                strb[str_num] = '9';
            }
        }
        else
        {
            printf("%s !Please use only the lower case!", stra);
            return 0;
        }
    }

    for (str_num = 0; str_num < str_len; str_num++)
    {
        final += strb[str_num] - '0';
    }

    printf("%s %i", strb, final);
    return 0;
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <strings.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *stra;
    char *strb;
    int str_num;
    int str_len;
    int final;
    final = 0;
    if ( (argc >= 2 && argv[1][0] < 'a') || (argc <= 1))
    {
        printf("!Argument missing!");
        return 0;
    }
    str_len = strlen(argv[1]);

    strb = (char*) malloc((str_len+1)*sizeof(char));

    for (str_num = 0; str_num < str_len; str_num++)
    {
        if (argv[1][str_num] <= 'z' && argv[1][str_num] >= 'a')
    {
        strb[str_num] = (argv[1][str_num] - 'a'+1) % 9 + '0'; //to get string with numbers from 1 to 9
        }
        else
        {
            printf("%s !Please use only the lower case!",argv[1]);
            return 0;
        }
    }
    strb[str_len] = '\0' // put the end char of the string : mandatory to print it.
    for (str_num = 0; str_num < str_len; str_num++)
    {
        final += strb[str_num] - '0';  // count the sum of the numbers from 1 to 9 ?
    }
    printf("%s %i",strb,final);
    free(strb);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect. I do not understand the use of malloc yet, but I have applied portions of your edited code; the program now works with desired output! Thank you very much for your help. –  salicemspiritus Dec 22 '11 at 21:44
    
malloc allocate memory : char* stra = malloc(str_len * sizeof(char)) allocate the memory for a sting of str_len (e.g. = 100) character exactly the same as char stra[100]; do. It is dynamically allocated, the advantge is that you do not have to know the size of the string before compiling... –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 22 '11 at 22:01
    
Thank you! #include<stdlib.h> takes care of the compiler warning: implicit declaration of malloc. –  salicemspiritus Dec 22 '11 at 22:16
    
This answer still needs some work... malloc without free, "* sizeof(char)", checking for char within 'a' to 'z' rather than just using isalpha or islower for <ctype.h>... –  dreamlax Dec 22 '11 at 22:22
    
yes... I added : free(strb);. using islower is another way to do the check... –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 22 '11 at 22:40

Seems like you're running past the end of your buffer strb:

char strb[0];
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On first inspection, it seems that your program would more or less work if this were

strb[str_num] = (stra[str_num] - 'a') % 9 + 1

Also, strb needs to be 27 characters long as well, not 0; 0-element arrays are rather poor at holding non-zero amounts of data!

You need to check for the argument using argc -- i.e.,

if (argc != 2)
    // complain here

Finally, when you're printing the results, you need to turn the ordinal numbers back into characters. Printing strb as a char* isn't going to give you 123, but rather ^A^B^C, not what you want. So you'll need to print those characters in a loop, adjusting each one by adding the offset of '0' back in.

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The % 9 - 207; is used so that only numbers 1 through 9 are used. For some reason I have to subtract 207 from the value to get the desired return, the % 9 makes sure J = 1, K = 2, et cetera. –  salicemspiritus Dec 22 '11 at 21:11
    
Also, If I set strb to a length of anything other than 0, it does not work. –  salicemspiritus Dec 22 '11 at 21:14
    
But it doesn't not work if you set it to 0 either, right? –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Dec 22 '11 at 21:15
    
strb needs to be dynamically allocated : with the same length as the string entered as command line parameter ! –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 22 '11 at 21:17
    
The same could be said of stra, but I wasn't worrying about that. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Dec 22 '11 at 21:19
strb[str_num] = (stra[str_num] - 'a') % 9 - 207;

The 207 is the largest problem here (aside from your off-by-one error). This line should read:

strb[str_num] = (stra[str_num] - 'a' + 1) % 9;
share|improve this answer
    
If I use that, I get smiley face ascii characters instead of integers as output. –  salicemspiritus Dec 22 '11 at 21:13
    
ok. if you want to print strb, you need the ascii code the numbers from 1 to 9 : strb[str_num] = (stra[str_num] - 'a' + 1) % 9 + '0'; –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 22 '11 at 21:23
    
Brilliant! Thank you, it was the + '0' I was missing. This works much better. Now there is only the issue of finding the digital mean. –  salicemspiritus Dec 22 '11 at 21:26
    
look at my answer... –  Hicham from CppDepend Team Dec 22 '11 at 21:33

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